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11 July

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Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

Director: Matt Reeves
Cast: Andy Serkis, Jason Clarke,l Gary Oldman, Keri Russell, Toby Kebbell, Judy Greer, Kodi Smit-McPhee
11 July
Dawn of the Planet of the Apes


Considering the complicated collection of failed reboots and proposed reimaginings this property went through, it’s stunning how good Russell Wyatt’s Rise of the Planet of the Apes was. With fans still smarting over Tim Burton’s unfairly demonized deconstruction of the sci-fi franchise, Fox really needed something to salvage the series. Now comes the second installment in the continuing clash between the last bastion of humanity and super intelligent Simians. Wyatt didn’t return but Matt “Cloverfield” Reeves is onboard, and by all accounts, he’s crafted a winner. Early reviews are rapturous, indicating a long life for this once struggling speculative movie material.


 

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And So It Goes

Director: Rob Reiner
Cast: Michael Douglas, Diane Keaton, Sterling Jerins, Paloma Guzmán, Frances Sternhagen, Frankie Valli
11 July
And So It Goes

Has Rob Reiner made a good movie in the last decade? Sure, some like the pairing of Oscar winners Jack Nicholson and Morgan Freeman in The Bucket List, but before that there was nothing but junk (Rumor Has It… ? Alex and Emma? The Story of Us?) and since then, well, let’s just say Flipped and The Magic of Belle Isle didn’t set the box office on fire. Here we get a RomCom for the Geritol set, with Michael Douglas (70) asking Diane Keaton (68) to help him deal with a granddaughter he never knew he had. Sounds corny and contrived. Actually, it sounds like late period Reiner.


 

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Boyhood

Director: Richard Linklater
Cast: Patricia Arquette, Ellar Coltrane, Ethan Hawke, Lorelei Linklater
11 July
Boyhood

This could very well be the movie of Summer 2014, if not the year. Fringe auteur Richard Linklater got the idea of making a “real time” movie about growing up and decided to try and make it happen. He gathered up two acting friends (Ethan Hawke and Patricia Arquette) and hired a newcomer, Ellar Coltrane, to play the child. Then, over the next 12 years, he filmed random scenes meant to chronicle the boy’s ever-changing life, following him from age six through 18. Already the owner of several festival awards, this could be the film that finally lands Linklater the Oscar he so richly deserves.


 

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The Fluffy Movie

Director: Manny Rodriguez
Cast: Gabriel Iglesias
11 July
The Fluffy Movie

“I’m not fat, I’m fluffy.” That’s the origin of comedian Gabriel Inglesias’ stage nickname. Of course, many of you already know this, but for those without Comedy Central or access to a Walmart, the Latino stand-up’s rise in the ranks will seem sudden. Of course, it will come as no surprise that he’s been working his craft since the late ‘90s. Like Kevin Hart, who went from stage to solo concert film to superstardom, Inglesias appears poised for a mainstream breakout. It may all depend on how well this movie does, and if he can translate his act into consistent commercial film roles.


 

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Land Ho!

Director: Martha Stephens, Aaron Katz
Cast: Paul Eenhoorn, Earl Lynn Nelson, Karrie Crouse, Elizabeth McKee, Alice Olivia Clarke, Emmsjé Gauti
11 July
Land Ho!

This movie is a mystery. The storyline features two aging ex-brothers-in-law who decide to head back to their home country of Iceland and “reclaim their youth”. Considering the subject, many critics who’ve seen the film as it played the festival circuit have complimented the movie for not being condescending or “cutesy” about its geriatric leads. In fact, a few have pointed out that directors Martha Stephens and Aaron Katz treat the subject of growing old with realism and bite. For the arthouse crowd, this sounds like a winner. For the rest of the moviegoing populace, there’s always the next tired tentpole on the horizon.


 

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A Long Way Down

Director: Pascal Chaumeil
Cast: Toni Collette, Pierce Brosnan, Imogen Poots, Aaron Paul, Rosamund Pike, Sam Neill
11 July
A Long Way Down

Four strangers—Brosnan, Collette, Poots, and Paul—meet on a London rooftop where they’ve all gathered to commit suicide. Sharing their similar desperation, they make a pact to wait and see before taking the tragic leap. Eventually, we learn the reasons behind each characters desire to die. Loosely based on Nick Hornby’s novel, this dark comedy has an interesting premise and some excellent performers. On the other hand, the narrative does tend to glamorize issues like depression and terminal illness. Director Pascal Chaumeil is an unknown quantity on these shores, so we’ll have to see if he can match his approach to Hornby’s vision.


 

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Rage

Director: Paco Cabezas
Cast: Nicolas Cage, Rachel Nichols, Peter Stormare, Danny Glover, Max Ryan, Judd Lormand
11 July
Rage

Nicolas Cage. Still paying off his IRS debt. That’s about all you need to know about this film. Seriously, no other well respected actor has taken out his financial issues on fans as pseudo-successfully as Cage, considering he can still wow us with a performance (David Gordon Green’s Joe), every once in a while. Here, he’s a criminal who gets in Dutch with the Russian mob. Naturally, this means a war, with Cage’s side winning. He tries to go legit. The former life drags him and his new pseudo family in. Yadda, yadda, yadda. Hopefully, Cage gets square with Uncle Sam and gets back to being awesome.


Since deciding to employ his underdeveloped muse muscles over five years ago, Bill has been a significant staff member and writer for three of the Web's most influential websites: DVD Talk, DVD Verdict and, of course, PopMatters. He also has expanded his own web presence with Bill Gibron.com a place where he further explores creative options. It is here where you can learn of his love of Swindon's own XTC, skim a few chapters of his terrifying tome in the making, The Big Book of Evil, and hear samples from the cassette albums he created in his college music studio, The Scream Room.


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