Call for Music Writers... Rock, Indie, Urban, Electronic, Americana, Metal, World and More

 
Music
Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA

The Cut-Out Bin #2
[19 August 2005]


Every year thousands of albums are released. A handful of these are strongly promoted and widely reviewed, and lodge in our collective memory as the significant records of an era. The rest slowly drift into those used CD racks at the back of record stores or the ad hoc shelves of close-out discounters and thrift stores to be largely forgotten, if they were even noticed in the first place. There, they join the music industry’s miscalculations, those huge-run sure-fire hits that missed, as well as the consumer cast-offs and albums sold back in a fit of post-fad buyer’s remorse, after fashions shift and the hype evaporates. In the old days of LPs, this trough of music-business effluvia was sometimes called the Cut-Out Bin after the albums that were notched and marked down for resale after they’d been returned to the manufacturer. If you were tuned out of musical trends, and had adventuresome tastes and could suspend judgment—or if you were just cheap and constrained to bargain shopping—you could dredge up some surprising finds from the mishmash, gems that could be treasured all the more for the improbability of your ever having stumbled upon them or for the courage it took to embrace them even though they had been publicly reviled. Here, PopMatters writers share some of their finds, the worthy-but-neglected albums rescued from the Cut-Out Bin of culture, and make the case for their continued relevance. May it inspire some slag-pile searches of your own.


Rob Horning




Holly Beth Vincent, Holly and the Italians (1982)
by Bill Gibron

This prototype female rocker also went to England to launch a career, but her records had no impact stateside. Meet the Chrissy Hynde who could have been.

>“After her first album, 1980’s The Right to Be Italian, she should have been christened the prototypical riot grrrl. Her album of blistering punk-pop was far more memorable than anemic offerings by the Go-Go’s or the Bangles.” e Italian, she should have been christened the prototypical riot grrrl. Her album of blistering punk-pop was far more memorable than anemic offerings by the Go-Go’s or the Bangles.”



[Read Essay]





Ten Wheel Drive with Genya Ravan, Construction #1 (1969)
by Justin Cober-Lake






Often compared to Janis Joplin, Genya Ravan, Ten Wheel Drive’s powerhouse vocalist, deserves her own spotlight.



>“Genya Ravan’s never received her due. Even if you haven’t heard her music, you should recognize her place in music history.” ou haven’t heard her music, you should recognize her place in music history.”



[Read Essay]





Soundtrack, Lost Boys (1987)
by Mark H. Harris






MTV’s success in the 1980s led inevitably to teen ‘films’ that were really stitched-together music videos. This was one of the best of the resulting soundtracks, proving that while some genre music can be exclusionary, crap is universal.



>“Like the vampires in this movie, this album shall live forever—not necessarily because it’s entombed in a thin veneer of the Aqua Sheen Kiefer Sutherland sports in the film as a coven leader, but because it encapsulates the age of the pop soundtrack.” ll live forever—not necessarily because it’s entombed in a thin veneer of the Aqua Sheen Kiefer Sutherland sports in the film as a coven leader, but because it encapsulates the age of the pop soundtrack.”



[Read Essay]




Now on PopMatters
PM Picks
Announcements

© 1999-2014 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters.com™ and PopMatters™ are trademarks
of PopMatters Media, Inc.

PopMatters is wholly independently owned and operated.