Recent Features
Bring on the Books for Everyone: How Literary Culture Became Popular Culture

Apparently, the love of literature can now be fully experienced only outside the academy and the New York literary scene, out there somewhere in the wilds of popular culture.

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Can You Imagine Standing in Line Just for a Newspaper?

'Suddenly and with little warning: STRIKE!' So began a 17-day newspaper delivery strike that prevented newspapers from getting to newsstands and doorsteps, as immortalised in the 1945 short, 17 Days: The Story of Newspaper History in the Making.

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Three Men Out at Sea: A Conversation with Dean Ween

PopMatters conducts an interview with co-founder of oddball rock outfit Ween in a rather unique environment: out at sea, fishing... and boy does Dean Ween have some choice words about the state of the music industry.

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You’ll Never Get Rich—Bwa! Ha! Ha!: Sgt. Bilko: The Phil Silvers Show

Is there always something subversive about comedy? Only when it's funny.

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Time Capsule of Our Culture: 1968’s ‘Hawaii Five-O’

When Alex O’Loughlin becomes Steve McGarrett on September 20, 2010, he ushers in Hawaii Five-O for a new generation and a new millennium. The re-imagined series will be viewed and critically reviewed on its own merits, but it can’t escape the original’s place in pop culture.

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Bloodletter: Ennis & Ezquerra’s Autopsy of the Female Action Hero Genre

Far from enforcing sexually exploitative stereotypes in the female action hero genre, Bloody Mary and sequel Bloody Mary: Lady Liberty simply explodes them.

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From Old World Underground to Hollywood (and Back): Metric’s New Wave Adventure

Emily Haines' journey with her band Metric has taken her everywhere from on stage with Lou Reed in Sydney, Australia to writing songs for teenage vampires in Hollywood. But all roads continue to lead back to her Toronto home.

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This Is a (Wo)Man’s World—Prime Suspect: The Complete Collection

The best thing about Prime Suspect is the density of it all, how we get beneath Tennison's skin to experience her desperation, her despair, and her desires.

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One Man’s Trash…: An Interview With Harmony Korine

First known to filmgoers as the teenage screenwriter of Larry Clark’s 1995 film Kids, Harmony Korine seems to have enjoyed that rarest of things within American cinema: the pursuit of a purely individual, often radically rebellious vision. PopMatters spoke with Korine about his career and his latest film, Trash Humpers.

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20 Questions: Tao Lin

American poet, novelist, short story writer, and artist Tao Lin’s new book, Richard Yates releases this week. Lin tells PopMatters 20 Questions that he’s never hired a hit man, or been on a spa vacation, or used Prozac. Honestly.

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Six Packs Ain’t Nothing More Than EPs With a Working-Class Name

EP sounds like an academic term. “Six pack” makes people think of beer, of a tough-guy’s abs, or Six Pack, the 1982 race-car comedy starring Kenny Rogers.

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Soundscape Mix #8: Orchestral Werks

Our latest free mix tape has a certain sense of refinement carried through tracks by the Cinematic Orchestra, the Quantic Soul Orchestra, Andromeda Mega Express Orchestra, and Casiokids. But, overall, this mix should be considered as seriously as a tuxedo t-shirt. Fun rules.

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For Tomorrow: William Gibson, ‘Zero History’ and The Present… The Interview

William Gibson's recent Zero History, rounds out a trilogy of novels that began in the wake of the 911 terror attacks, and spanned the decade. In a meditative encounter with PopMatters, Gibson shares his thoughts on Zero History, the Bigend Trilogy, and the enduring present.

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Ironically Facebook and Its 500 Million Friends Remain Largely a Mystery

In the beginning, Mark Zuckerberg was a socially-awkward teenager, a computer science major at Harvard University, who arrived toting an eight-foot-long whiteboard as a brainstorming tool...

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9 Sep 2010 // 10:00 PM

Vampire Misogyny: Violence in ‘True Blood’

From the beginning of its debut, True Blood has pushed the edge of what was possible with TV violence and sex. But is there any point to the extreme sex and violence on the show? And has it gone too far?

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Honesty and Cruelty by the Numbers: Pitchfork and the Art of Tastemaking

It's because of timely reporting on fresh-faced bands that Pitchfork has managed to turn itself into an independent music tastemaker, setting the tone for the critical reception of new music.

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“You’re Your Own Combustible Fire”: A Conversation with the Most Serene Republic

Swiping movies scores from Jon Brion? Smoking up with Michael Bublé? Crafting album titles out of Lewis Carroll-inspired word games? Vocalist Adrian Jewett talks to PopMatters about his band's Juno nomination, it's never-ending stream of EPs, and finally getting a Jewish drummer.

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In a world of 24-hour programming, Jay Mariotti's Around the Horn does for ESPN what Glenn Beck or Bill O’Reilly does for Fox News: fill in large gulfs of empty space between actual news or events by making a fetish of opinion.

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20 Questions: David Michôd, Director of ‘Animal Kingdom’

Animal Kingdom is the critically acclaimed feature debut of young Australian director, David Michôd, who has helmed many short films that have made the festival circuit.

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7 Sep 2010 // 10:00 PM

‘The Wire’ As American Noir

The Wire’s intentional difficulty and rigor -- along with academia’s ongoing love affair with cultural studies -- might very well explain its emerging as a centerpiece in a growing number of courses at many colleges and universities in the United States.

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More Recent Features
//Mixed media
//Blogs

NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

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