Recent Features
Smoke Up, Johnny: The Breakfast Club, Still Gloriously Poignant 25 Years Later

The Breakfast Club remains a defining moment for a generation 25 years later. What endures is the sheer heart that defines the film, the way that it supplies stark, grave candor and quirky spunk in equal measure.

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Ain’t No Cure for the Digital Virus

How I came to love electronic music... I got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell looped and thrown over a 4/4 or broken beat with a bad ass bass line.

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MP3s, the Death of the Record Store, and the Birth of the Closet Hipster

Fed only by their own appetite for new music, the Closet Hipsters explore the Internet in isolation where they can take in the enormous breadth of music now available on their own terms.

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Curtains: Adventures of an Undertaker-in-Training

There’s a time, from when someone dies to when they magically pop up at the funeral or the cemetery or as a bag of ashes, that remains a black hole, invisible to the rest of the world, and everyone’s happy with the arrangement.

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Going Solo: The Return of the One-man Band

Maybe it’s the crappy economy, or just an extension of the long-term trend in popular music toward smaller and smaller ensembles, but it sure seems like there are a lot of one-man bands out there lately.

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A Hundred or More Hidden Things: The Life and Films of Vincente Minnelli

It was Judy Garland’s affinity for the absurd that triggered Vincent Minelli’s idea for a film version of The Pirate, a rakish story that would employ Garland, Gene Kelly, and a very strange song composed by Cole Porter.

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Richard Pryor’s Designated Writer: An Interview With Paul Mooney

In a new memoir, veteran stand-up comic Paul Mooney reflects on his life and work with the legendary comedian Richard Pryor and their struggle against racism in Hollywood.

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Natural Selection: An Interview with John Davis of Title Tracks

John Davis, formerly of Q and Not U and indie darlings Georgie James, talks to PopMatters about his past breakups, covering the Boss and the Byrds, and the transition from drummer to front man for his new band Title Tracks.

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He Took It All Too Far:  David Bowie’s “Ziggy” Years, 1971-1973

At a time when the rock heroes of the era embodied macho appeal and dressed down in jeans and T-shirts, Bowie’s Ziggy struck an incongruous chord while challenging gender identifications.

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25 Mar 2010 // 8:59 PM

Where the Wild Things Are

Even if its pleasures outweigh its disappointments, Where the Wild Things Are is another in a series of Spike Jonze’s ambitious but flawed projects.

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SXSW 2010: But Can It Be Monetized?

After five days of sun, beer, panel discussions and performances from sun up 'til sun up, what have we learned? Brand yourself, exploit social media, and make some music once in a while.

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The Cure for the Sleepless Nights Blues

Something had to knock this sleepless child out and put her in a blissful somnambulistic state. That something turned out to be the raucous guitar musings of Texas-born blues guitarist Johnny Winter.

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Beyond Barthes: Shawn Michaels vs The Undertaker, Wrestlemania XXV

If any wrestling match has crossed over to the emotional realm, it's the epic bout between Shawn Michaels and The Undertaker, but is it enough to bring sensitivity to professional wrestling?

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Oh Captain, My Captain America

Even though he's no Batman or Spider-Man, the buzz over who will play Captain America reached a fever pitch because he's the embodiment of the American flag and stands for the ideals of the United States.

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Sublimated Rage, Sex and the History of Cinema: An Interview with Chloe Director Atom Egoyan

Toronto-based Egoyan fuses Melodrama with the Psychological Thriller and meticulously constructs a classic star vehicle for one of the finest working American actresses, Julianne Moore.

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Beneath the Great Wave: Azzarello and Morales Return to the Roots of Comics

Azzarello and Morales tap the roots of modern popular culture to offer a highly stylized view of the birth of comic books.

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Wake the Dead or No One Will Listen: Skid Row’s Subhuman Race

In 1995, Skid Row fell back on the only choice that remains for a metal band with no place in the mainstream culture: they made the heaviest damn album in the world.

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You Couldn’t Ignore Me If You Tried, by Susannah Gora

This book is part cultural analysis of ‘80s youth films, part trivia, and whole bunch walk down memory lane.

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22 Mar 2010 // 9:00 PM

December Boys: On Life and Alex Chilton

Alex Chilton spent his musical life testing the limits of his enormous gifts and the patience of his devoted fans. He was a conflicted artist, equally talented and mistrusting of his talents. Music came easily, so he made it harder.

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Georges Melies: The Most Important Filmmaker You’ve (Probably) Never Seen

It’s tempting to say that without Melies, there would be no Avatar, no vampire movies, no Star Wars or Star Trek, no special-effects extravaganzas, no docu-drama like Erin Brockovich, no animation, no Walt Disney, and no porn.

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More Recent Features
//Mixed media
//Blogs

The Moving Pixels Podcast Explores 'This Is the Police'

// Moving Pixels

"This week we take a look at the themes and politics of This Is the Police.

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