Recent Features
Hitchcock 101: Day Seven, 1954 - 1955

Many film fans consider Hitchcock’s career to have really begun in about 1951 (with Strangers on a Train) and to have ended in 1963 (with The Birds).

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“Out of the Conflict Comes Great Art”: An Interview with Bryan Devendorf of the National

Bryan Devendorf, drummer for the National, discusses High Violet, questionable lyrics, and how to rob Interpol.

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The Road Goes on Forever and the Party Never Ends: An Interview with Widespread Panic

Becoming CNN's house band? Giving away all their touring profits while garnering their best chart position ever? Having a safeword for the band? Widespread Panic's John Bell talks about the fantastic, non-stop, and sometimes downright surreal life that the Panic has lived the past 25 years.

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Hitchcock, Zeal and the Velvet Rope

More than almost any other of the great directors, Hitchcock filled his films with characters that are either explicitly or implicitly coded as gay. And almost always as villainous.

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Hitchcock 101: Day Six, 1948 - 1954

In this sixth installment of our overview of Hitchcock’s oeuvre, we take a look at his most divisive period -- a string of wildly inconsistent material ranging from masterpieces to films we didn’t even bother reviewing.

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Pete Seeger… Un Hombre Sincero

These two documents transport listeners and viewers back to the heart of the civil rights era and reaffirm Seeger's creation of a truly global music of conscience that can transcend the limitations of its local translations.

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The Puppeteer of Suspense

No one likes being toyed with, but Hitchcock makes it clear that he is in control; he is directing us, influencing how we think and react to the situation at hand -- and we love him for it.

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Hitchcock 101: Day Five, 1944 - 1946

Three films of the mid-1940s found Hitchcock in an experimental mode. One takes place entirely in a small boat, another explores the idea of the psychedelic, and the third stretches out into the territory of film noir, while animating the post-war sense of global interconnectedness that presaged the Cold War.

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16 Jun 2010 // 10:00 PM

Portugal. The Man: Alaska’s Rock ‘n’ Roll Saviors

Alaska's Portugal. The Man have been gaining quite a following outside of their native state. Singer and guitarist John Gourley talks about the lessons they've learned growing up in the land of Sarah Palin, and how it's affected their approach to life as a rock band.

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We Don’t Die, We Multiply: R&B Posse Tracks

Take Whitney Houston's "Saving All My Love For You", a steamy tale of a mistress longing for romantic bliss with a married man, and imagine how it might play out with a multi-perspective delivery.

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“Some of My Best Friends Are in Concentration Camps”: The Absence of Jews in Hitchcock’s WWII Films

Although Hitchcock made several films expressing his opposition to the Nazis, viewing these films leads to the question: Where was any mention of the Jews who were so profoundly affected by the Nazis and WWII?

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Hitchcock 101: Day Four, 1941 - 1943

As the war in Europe raged, Hitchcock remained in the relative safety of his adopted home far from the bombs that rocked his home country, but Hitch put together a series of fascinating movies dealing with themes of betrayal, paranoia, deceit, and the creeping horror of doubt.

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Gotham After The Rain: The Cult of Personality of Batman and Robin

Morrison's "Bat-God" gets a makeover after the seeming death of Bruce Wayne, revealing Gotham's near-deification of not just the man, but of everything from the costume to his methods to his legend and legacy.

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20 Questions: Sloane Crosley

Satirist Sloane Crosley’s How Did You Get This Number regales with hilarious tales involving amateur clowns, a kleptomaniac roommate and a black bear. PopMatters 20 Questions found her at a seemingly safe and quiet spot, for the moment, someplace with contemplation-inducing bathroom tiles…

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Tea and Scones Suspense: Hitchcock’s “English” Movies of the Early 1940s

Although Hitchcock left Great Britain for the United States in 1939, his first two films -- Rebecca (1940) and Suspicion (1941) -- nonetheless remained set firmly in English. His depiction of English life helped craft perceptions of English life for decades to come.

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Hitchcock 101: Day Three, 1940 - 1941

New to Hollywood, it didn’t take long for Hitchcock to master his surroundings, winning the Best Picture Oscar with his first American film. Then, it was on to a series of iffy studio experiments, including perhaps the most bizarre entry in his oeuvre, a screwball comedy starring Carole Lombard!

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‘Tis the Season To Be Jolly. And Gay.

Between the parades and parties and protests this month, make time to whip up a batch of Pink Ladies and raise your glasses to the countless unsung LGBT individuals who are blazing…no, flaming a path for us all.

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The Importance of Being Ernest: Easton Corbin and the Country Boy Hemingway Code

Easton Corbin's debut reads like a 'Farewell to Arms' for the truck-pull set and lays out a hero's code for existentialist country boys everywhere; that is, the practical application of action over thought.

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Stop Laughing: A Difference of Laughter Between British and American Hitchcock

While Hitchcock is famous for the humor that he injects into his thrillers, there are striking differences in the humor between his British and American periods.

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Hitchcock 101: Day Two, 1935-1938

In Day Two of our Director Spotlight series on the Master of Suspense, we revisit the four strongest films of Hitchcock’s British period.

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More Recent Features
//Mixed media
//Blogs

'Doctor Who': Casting a Woman as the Doctor Offers Fresh Perspectives and a New Kind of Role Model

// Channel Surfing

"The BBC's announcement of Jodie Whittaker as the first female Doctor has sections of fandom up in arms. Why all the fuss?

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