Recent Features

16 Jun 2010 // 10:00 PM

Portugal. The Man: Alaska’s Rock ‘n’ Roll Saviors

Alaska's Portugal. The Man have been gaining quite a following outside of their native state. Singer and guitarist John Gourley talks about the lessons they've learned growing up in the land of Sarah Palin, and how it's affected their approach to life as a rock band.

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We Don’t Die, We Multiply: R&B Posse Tracks

Take Whitney Houston's "Saving All My Love For You", a steamy tale of a mistress longing for romantic bliss with a married man, and imagine how it might play out with a multi-perspective delivery.

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“Some of My Best Friends Are in Concentration Camps”: The Absence of Jews in Hitchcock’s WWII Films

Although Hitchcock made several films expressing his opposition to the Nazis, viewing these films leads to the question: Where was any mention of the Jews who were so profoundly affected by the Nazis and WWII?

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Hitchcock 101: Day Four, 1941 - 1943

As the war in Europe raged, Hitchcock remained in the relative safety of his adopted home far from the bombs that rocked his home country, but Hitch put together a series of fascinating movies dealing with themes of betrayal, paranoia, deceit, and the creeping horror of doubt.

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Gotham After The Rain: The Cult of Personality of Batman and Robin

Morrison's "Bat-God" gets a makeover after the seeming death of Bruce Wayne, revealing Gotham's near-deification of not just the man, but of everything from the costume to his methods to his legend and legacy.

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20 Questions: Sloane Crosley

Satirist Sloane Crosley’s How Did You Get This Number regales with hilarious tales involving amateur clowns, a kleptomaniac roommate and a black bear. PopMatters 20 Questions found her at a seemingly safe and quiet spot, for the moment, someplace with contemplation-inducing bathroom tiles…

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Tea and Scones Suspense: Hitchcock’s “English” Movies of the Early 1940s

Although Hitchcock left Great Britain for the United States in 1939, his first two films -- Rebecca (1940) and Suspicion (1941) -- nonetheless remained set firmly in English. His depiction of English life helped craft perceptions of English life for decades to come.

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Hitchcock 101: Day Three, 1940 - 1941

New to Hollywood, it didn’t take long for Hitchcock to master his surroundings, winning the Best Picture Oscar with his first American film. Then, it was on to a series of iffy studio experiments, including perhaps the most bizarre entry in his oeuvre, a screwball comedy starring Carole Lombard!

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‘Tis the Season To Be Jolly. And Gay.

Between the parades and parties and protests this month, make time to whip up a batch of Pink Ladies and raise your glasses to the countless unsung LGBT individuals who are blazing…no, flaming a path for us all.

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The Importance of Being Ernest: Easton Corbin and the Country Boy Hemingway Code

Easton Corbin's debut reads like a 'Farewell to Arms' for the truck-pull set and lays out a hero's code for existentialist country boys everywhere; that is, the practical application of action over thought.

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Stop Laughing: A Difference of Laughter Between British and American Hitchcock

While Hitchcock is famous for the humor that he injects into his thrillers, there are striking differences in the humor between his British and American periods.

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Hitchcock 101: Day Two, 1935-1938

In Day Two of our Director Spotlight series on the Master of Suspense, we revisit the four strongest films of Hitchcock’s British period.

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‘Blackmail’ and the Birth of the British Talkies

Originally conceived as a silent film, Blackmail was quickly converted to sound, making it the first British talkie. To accommodate theaters that were not equipped for sound, it was reissued as a silent film. The differences in the two versions are here compared.

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The Screwball World of Nathanael West and Eileen McKenney: A ‘Suspicious’ Literary Biography

Marion Meade's new book begs the question: Are literary biographies necessary? Somewhere in the afterlife, Nathanael West is having a good chuckle.

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iPhone 4: Wherein Science Fiction Once Again Becomes Sad Fact

Aside from lightsabers, proton packs, warp drive and teleportation, many of my favorite sci-fi gadgets have become a reality. The latest: iPhone 4.

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Hitchcock 101: Day One, 1927 - 1934

In today's installment of our retrospective survey of Hitchcock's singular career we revisit his first major statements. Thrillingly, all of Hitchcock's trademark themes and signature moves are visible in these early masterpieces -- an uncanny talent, Hitch arrived, it would seem, fully formed.

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“Get Out of the Shower”: The “Shower Scene” and Hitchcock’s Narrative Style in ‘Psycho’

In Psycho, Alfred Hitchcock subverts the narrative expectations laid out in the early parts of the film, producing something very different from the suspense film that we anticipate.

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‘Psycho’: The Mother of All Horrors

Psycho stands out not only for being one of Alfred Hitchcock's greatest films, it is also one of his most influential, providing both a template and source material for an almost endless succession of later horror films, making it appropriate to identify it as the mother of all horror films.

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Fruity Islands, Paw-Paw Bears and Gleaming the Cube: The Internet at Its Most Essential

Every utilitarian object in my home boasts an invitation to visit its website. Are there forums where pleased consumers come together to share their contentment about lip balm and adhesive bandages?

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“An Adult Person”: An Interview with Gareth from Los Campesinos!

In four years, Los Campesinos! have put out three albums, toured the world several times, and become critically-adored indie-rock darlings. So why is Gareth Campesinos! still obsessed with gloom and doom? Atheism, meeting fans expectations, and an aversion to their poppier early songs all make up this insightful interview.

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'Hopscotch' is Anchored in Walter Matthau's Playful, Irascible Personality

// Short Ends and Leader

"With his novel, Hopscotch, Brian Garfield challenged himself to write a suspenseful spy tale in which nobody gets killed.

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