Recent Features
Captain Jack As a Digital Weapon: Launching ‘Torchwood’ Comic #1

Is Torchwood the true “digital weapon” that can successfully market its stories in any medium—not just TV episodes, but also novels, radio plays, and now a comic book?

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House of the Rising Sun Lamp: Jersey Shore UNCENSORED: Season One

The youth whom I was concerned for regarding this program are not the network’s audience, as I thought, but its stars. Most seem aware that there is a direct relationship between outrageous behavior and screen time.

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Keep Me Away From the Present Tense: An Interview with Librarians

PopMatters spoke with the band’s co-leader, Ryan Hizer, about Morgantown’s surprisingly cool music scene, those fickle things called influences and the band you should really be listening to: Big Ass Manatee.

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1 Aug 2010 // 9:59 PM

Sing, Memory

It’s comforting to think that no matter how addled my mind gets, I’ll always be able to temporarily return to a clearer past with the help of a song or two, playing in my brain.

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Barbequing with Legends: Robert Duvall and Sissy Spacek on Cinema, Cinephilia and Good-Looking Shoes

On the eve of the release of Get Low, PopMatters talks with film legends Sissy Spacek and Robert Duvall about food criticism (sort of), film critics (without mentioning any, ahem, names), and of course, cute shoes (and a few other things).

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Partial to His Abracadabra: A Discussion of Ian Dury with Biographer Will Birch

On the release of his new book, Ian Dury: The Definitive Biography, Will Birch discusses the complicated glory of the “Upminster Kid".

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A Shark May Not Teach You Lessons About Goodness Like Santa Clause Does, But It Might Eat Your Head

Christmas in July is a superficial, commercial non-event, so why not celebrate a new Shark Week holiday, a holy season you can really sink your teeth into?

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Mixing It Up With Dan Black

Although he sometimes covers hip-hop songs and has collaborated with rapper Kid Cudi, don’t dismiss Black as another white rapper -- he sings all of his songs, including his rap covers, in a voice that is part Perry Farrell and part Thom Yorke.

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‘In the Bedroom’ Highlights a Career of Risk-Taking

Mazur heads for coastal Maine, where the film was shot, for an in-depth look at the crown jewel in a career of amazing performances by Spacek. He also eats a lot of seafood, takes a hard look at ageism and discovers how location can inform an actor's work just as much as it can a writer's.

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Future Shock, Postmodern Nostalgia, and Uncanny Technologies

The speed of technological change is unprecedented. Author Anna Jane Grossman finds that it has imbued her "with a kind of odd nostalgia for right now.”

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Bridging the Gap: An Interview with Salvador Santana

A man of his times, Salvador Santana's sound has a difficult-to-quantify coolness that attracts his Generation Y peers, yet its gentle chug-chug beats aren't likely to alienate older Gen Xers or even their Boomer parents. He talks to PopMatters about his latest album, his self-image as an artist, and the indirect influences his famous father has had on his musical journey.

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“Patty Hearst Heard the Burst”: Joshua Dysart’s Unknown Soldier

It’s impossible, while reading Joshua Dysart and Alberto Ponticelli’s superlative Unknown Soldier, to not think of the late, great Warren Zevon’s ballad of Roland, the so-called “headless Thompson gunner”, and his seemingly endless battle. Perhaps there's a reason for that.

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“Good Country People”: Mid-Period Sissy Spacek and Middle America

In her second decade in the film business, Sissy Spacek could be found in mile-high brunette wigs singing at the Grand Ole Opry, working opposite some of the most celebrated men and women in film history, and of course, front and center at the Academy Awards.

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Wales: So “Cool Cymru” Part I

While England was exporting the Beatles, Rolling Stones, and the Who '60s, Wales offered up Shirley Bassey, Mary Hopkin, and Tom Jones. Things changed, thankfully, and Super Furry Animals became the heart and soul of the Wales “Cool Cymru” movement.

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A Blues for Walter: Remembering a Gospel Legend

A towering figure in gospel music history, the late Bishop Walter Hawkins not only built an impressive discography that helped shape the contemporary gospel sound, but he also created a body of work that remains central to the black religious experience.

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All The Things They Do!: A Superstar Interview with Adam Schlesinger & Mike Viola

Playing shows this week in Philadelphia and New York that delves deep down into their catalogs, PopMatters catches up with both the Candy Butchers' Mike Viola and Fountains of Wayne's Adam Schlesinger to talk Stevie, Beyonce, and being in multiple bands at once.

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Sissy Spacek in the ‘70s: The Brilliant Light at the End of the Time Tunnel

No actress better epitomized the '70s than Sissy Spacek. She stands as the Me Decade personified, a beautiful if brutal, fragile yet ferocious combination of survivor, savant, and starlight.

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Morality in Mystery Dungeon: ‘Shiren the Wanderer’

The moral of Shiren the Wanderer is one of the few that only a game can truly teach; aspects of the story, new locations, items, and characters all have far more emotional resonance if we have to struggle for them.

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“I’m Never Quite Sure What to Expect”: An Interview with Rufus Wainwright

Just as he kicks off the next leg of the tour supporting his stark, cathartic album revolving around his mother's passing, Rufus Wainwright talks to PopMatters about Shakespeare, Stieglitz, and how the first half of his performance each night is one of the hardest things he's ever had to get through.

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Giving Up the Ghost: Sissy Spacek’s Texas Legend

There’s something to being Texan that Sissy understands -- something about its vastness, how it’s part of both the South and the West, how it gives us that rapid speech with drawling vowels.

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More Recent Features
//Mixed media
//Blogs

NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

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