Recent Features
Phosphorescent: Peeling Back the Surface

Phosphorescent’s Matt Houck talks about his kicking country band, a brush with big time country at Farm Aid and the psychedelic weirdness that lurks just below the surface of his songs.

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Amon Tobin Part 2: A Cool Acousmatic Cat

Tobin's goal as a composer was to create music that truly reflected the time in which it was made, and to see how far he could remove his samples from their sources before arranging them in new contexts. He achieved such an artifact with each album.

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Who Is Henry Pym, and Why Are They Saying Such Terrible Things About Him?

Dan Slott has redeemed the founding Avenger and leader of the "Mighty" team, deftly and expertly removing him from the ghetto of mischaracterized misanthropic anti-heroes just in time for the Heroic Age.

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The Non-Judging Breakfast Club: ‘Gossip Girl’ and the Pretend Teenager

The aspirational dynamic at work with the majority of the show's viewers – adult women – is a fantasy do-over of their high school experience. Gossip Girl is a teen show for adults.

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Every Man in This Village Is a Liar: An Education in War

Legend was he was ruthless in war, killing enemies with his bare hands. He said he knew where Osama bin Laden was hiding. And now he was petting me like a puppy.

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Jazz Ain’t Dead, But Charlie Parker Is—So Let’s Move On, Shall We?

If Charlie Parker rose from the dead I have no doubt that he'd cheer on the hip hop orchestras and Bugge Wesseltoft's piano thumping electronica. He would definitely be a fan of Esperanza Spalding.

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A Is for Actor, B Is for Band: Breaking the Stigma of the “Actor’s Band”

The public has long had an affinity for the strange and less than wonderful, and the concept of an actor recording a CD invariably brings up the ghosts of dead music careers past. So, bands that happen to include an actor/musician need to follow Beecake’s and Blue Gillespie’s example.

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Masked Serfs, Feral Children, and a Traveling Portraitist: An Interview with Rasputina

Playing the drunken air cello? Serf warfare? Recruiting new band members via e-mail? All in a day's work for Rasputina's Melrora Creager, who talks to PopMatters about the band's new album and oh so much more ...

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Confessions of a Political Romantic: Christopher Hitchens’ ‘Hitch-22’

Hitchens often remarks here on his being a late bloomer, and so it is that some will see the core of Hitch-22 as the story of the author’s inner journey in adulthood from firebrand '60s campus radical to geezery Tory of the Anglo-American variety.

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24 Jun 2010 // 10:00 PM

Love, Tilda Style

Oscar-winner Tilda Swinton talks to PopMatters about a quiet, sophisticated melodrama set in a golden cage, Carlo Cracco-inspired gastro-porn, and the glint of cinematic gold captured in a still moment.

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Hitchcock’s Final Steps on the Path to Destruction

The path through destruction that they have walked, guided along by Hitchcock much like Virgil guided Dante in the circles of Hell, is what people remember most after watching Rear Window, Psycho, and Vertigo.

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Hitchcock 101: Day Eleven, 1969 - 1976

In his final three films, Hitchcock may have showed his age, but there are undeniable treasures to be found even in these lesser works.

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Peyton Place: When Discretion Was Partly a Genteel Quality, Partly a Requirement of the Censor

A world where nothing is right or reassuring, and little will ever be resolved happily, not in 30-minutes or 30 years – TV as depression, an endless picturesque grind. Rather like life.

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Sinister Footfalls on a Darkened Stair: Hitchcock and His Continuing Sphere of Influence

More than any other studio system director, Alfred Hitchcock has influenced an amazing international collection of postmodern movie makers.

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Hitchcock 101: Day Ten, 1963 - 1966

Today we’ll examine the last Hitchcock masterpiece, and begin our discussion of his slow denouement.

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Confederacy of Bad-Asses 1: You ‘n Me, We Onna Same Side, Homes

The first in a series of Iconographies examining Garth Ennis-scripted Punisher villains spotlights Barracuda, one of the Punisher's sickest, most deranged enemies, who also turns out to be almost the exact same man.

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Vampires vs. Werewolves: An Immortal Pop Rivalry

Pop culture thrives on rivalries, but few are as epic as the one between werewolves and vampires -- a rivalry which predates Twilight by, oh, some 60 years.

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Hitchcock, Haneke and the Psycho-Sexual Voyeur Apparatus

“The film knows that it is being watched, and yet does not know,” says Christian Metz. “The one who knows is the cinema, the institution..."

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The Primal Drive of Fear and Desire in Hitchcock’s ‘Vertigo’ and ‘The Birds’

Typical of Hitchcock, he does not provide answers in Vertigo and The Birds, rather, he demonstrates the inherent dangers of living with -- yet denying -- the dark psychic forces that control our lives from deep withing our subconscious minds.

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Hitchcock 101: Day Nine, 1959 - 1960

About 50 years ago Hitchcock followed his artistic masterpiece with two of the most important movies ever to emerge from Hollywood. Two very different pictures, each was to chart a course for an entire genre.

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More Recent Features
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//Blogs

Treasuring Memories of Paul McCartney on 'One on One' Tour

// Notes from the Road

"McCartney welcomed Bruce Springsteen and Steven Van Zandt out for a song at Madison Square Garden.

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