Recent Features
Part Three: Pushing the Envelope, 1977-1978

PolyGram, a group of "macho men", and Star Wars bolstered Casablanca at retail, on radio, and in the clubs. While expanding the roster and its partnerships, the label also landed its first number one single.

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Red Menace in the Mirror: Identity, Politics and Identity Politics in Superman Red Son

In writer Mark Millar's visionary recasting of Superman as a Soviet dictator, questions of personal and social identity become the staging point for a central drama around global justice.

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18 Aug 2009 // 9:58 PM

Vinyl Spin Cycle

Each time I sheepishly purchase another CD, I’m digging myself further into the technological hole, and falling farther behind the cool vinyl-playing crowd.

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Like ‘The New York Times’—with a Pink Boa and a Tiara

Local LGBT papers are a vital part of our community. They bind us together, and they have played a major role in the development of that community. If only they were more inclusive.

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Part Two: Painting the Building, 1975-1977

KISS came "Alive" in 1975. So did Parliament and Donna Summer. In a dramatic reversal of its uncertain beginnings, Casablanca cultivated a colony of successful acts and expanded its reach with boutique labels and partnerships in the film industry.

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17 Aug 2009 // 9:59 PM

Remaking History: An Interview with Quentin Tarantino

Tarantino talks about his decision to rewrite world history with Inglourious Basterds and the critical reaction to his recent films.

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Is Alyse Myers’ Life More Important Than Yours?

Ding dong! Ding dong! Another dysfunctional-family memoir bearing a terrible secret is at the door!

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Part One: Leading the Camel to Water, 1974-1975

Casablanca was not an instant success but Neil Bogart, a dreamer and a doer, was undeterred. Part I examines how the sheik of Casablanca led his camel out of the desert.

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Three Days, Forty Years, Six Discs

It's the enticing performances of the smaller acts -- and not the explosions of the big ones -- that made Woodstock such a singular event.

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“No Dad, What About You?!”: The John Hughes Generation Conflict

John Hughes went to bat for us teenagers against the evil Baby Boomer adults and the damage their material expectations inflicted on the classic American nuclear family.

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13 Aug 2009 // 10:00 PM

“You’re Not Don Draper”

Last season on Mad Men, as marketing master Don Draper became a recognizable brand in the real world, the show that gave birth to him began to dismantle his identity episode by episode.

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13 Aug 2009 // 9:59 PM

Oceans of Fear

Brace yourself: this is a fish tale that can silence – like the great white shark itself – all of its competitors.

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‘Funny People’ and the Advent of the Social Network Narrative

If the public prefers disposable, computer generated product about man-babies to dramas about human relationships, then Funny People may be plugged directly in to the zeitgeist.

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12 Aug 2009 // 10:00 PM

Where Strides the Behemoth

Begrand talks with Darski of Behemoth, one of the most visually imposing and sonically punishing bands in all of metal, on the eve of the release of their new CD, Evangelion.

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There’s a Griot Goin’ On: An Interview with Justin Adams and Juldeh Camara

The former guitarist for Robert Plant and the Gambia riti virtuoso discuss their unlikely, but incredibly fruitful, musical partnership.

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12 Aug 2009 // 9:59 PM

Perfect Moments of Escape

Are the girls of John Hughes' films feminists? Does it matter? For '90s girls like me, Hughes' female leads were less reflections of ourselves than welcome respites from a teen culture much rougher around the edges.

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The ‘Michael Jacksons’ and All Their Infuriating Complexity

Maybe it’s more fun to idolize or demonize public figures than to have more complex, mixed feelings about them.

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11 Aug 2009 // 10:00 PM

The Kids Are All Write: Pitchfork Music Festival 2009

After three days of sore feet, throbbing eardrums, and insufficient sleep, Pitchfork’s annual music festival was a welcome reminder of how good rock music can feel.

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The Legacy of Mike Wieringo: The Flash Years

The true legacy of Mike Wieringo is his radical redefining of the comics industry's obsession with navel-gazing.

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Comics, Art for the Idiosyncratic

With little pressure to conform to storytelling or visual norms, comics are rife with artists like Jason Shiga, who bends and splices genres, and whose aesthetic sense is readily identifiable as his own.

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More Recent Features
//Mixed media
//Blogs

Moving Pixels Podcast: Our Own Points of View on 'Hardcore Henry'

// Moving Pixels

"Hardcore Henry gives us a chance to consider not how well a video game translates to film, but how well a video game point of view translates to film.

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