Recent Features
Detachment and Re-attachment: The Mind of a Hermit No More

Christopher Knight disappeared into the woods at the age of 20 and returned at 47 without a masterpiece, without a testimony of life’s greater purpose, without anything profound to convey.

READ more
Visual Literacy: An Interview With Robert Mockler of ‘Like Me’

Robert Mockler reflects on enabling collaboration, the solitude of the edit, the guidance of film history -- and the exciting changes social media is bringing to film.

READ more
What Defines the Line Between Inclusivity and Queerbaiting?

It was the year of the African American, not the LGBTQ, at the Academy Awards -- we can't have both. Perhaps the new hashtag should be #Oscarsoblackandwhite.

READ more
Groundswell: An Interview With Angaleena Presley

The former Pistol Annie's brazen new album reflects on her time in the music industry and the future it holds for women.

READ more
Max Richter on How Music Helps Him Understand the World

"I love the ballet because it's a language which I'm not a native speaker of. I admire and love watching ballet, but I'm not a dancer, so for me it has a magical quality."

READ more
Istanbul: From Emperors to Street Vendors

Historian Thomas F. Madden's Istanbul leaves one with a sense of awe for how much of the human experience is on display in this one city, in this part of the world.

READ more
Eleven Madison Park vs Alinea: The Ultimate Restaurant Grudge Match

On the comparative merits of Eleven Madison Park versus Alinea, on the occasion of Eleven Madison Park being named the best restaurant in the world.

READ more
Bureau of Sabotage Set to Rock for Resistance at Bicycle Day and Beyond

Burbridge says fans can expect to see Bureau of Sabotage take risks as they seek to be fully in the moment, following in the tradition of the original Acid Test parties where the fledgling Grateful Dead weren’t even necessarily required to play.

READ more
Can We Say the F Word Yet? On Fascism and Humor

In light of the decrees and executive orders signed thus far by Donald Trump, we might reasonably ask: is fascism relevant to America's current political state?

READ more
Authenticity and Unbroken Chains in Rick Massimo’s ‘I Got a Song’

This book is about true believers who kept the torch burning for “authenticity” in folk music at any cost; even if it meant cultural appropriation and commercial compromising.

READ more
It Takes a Village to Put a Man on the Moon: An Interview With the Creator’s of ‘Mission Control’

Director David Fairhead and Executive Producer Keith Haviland of Mission Control marvel at the men behind the first man on the moon.

READ more

14 Apr 2017 // 10:01 AM

J. Geils: 1946-2017

Hard Drivin’ Man: J. Geils brought blues, jazz, soul -- and his name -- to one of rock’s great bands

READ more
‘About Time’ Is the Donald Trump of Romantic Comedies

About Time professes to celebrate life, but instead celebrates perhaps the most narcissistic, selfish behaviour ever rendered in film.

READ more
Ripples in the Water: A Conversation With Nick Allbrook of Pond

Nick Allbrook discusses politics, new music from Pond, and the influence of his native country, Australia, on his music.

READ more
In Praise of Comedy Films That Aren’t Funny

A look at the rather funnily not funny films, Blast-Off and Won Ton Ton, the Dog Who Saved Hollywood.

READ more
Make What You Can: An Interview With Maximo Park

In a change of pace, UK guitar-rock giants Maximo Park tackle both the political and the personal on their latest effort.

READ more
So Help Me: Bartlet, Trump, and the Presidential God-complex

The West Wing's Jed Bartlet developed a God-complex because he became president; Donald Trump ran for president because of his existing God-complex.

READ more
The Old Dominion in Song: Lamb of God’s “Hourglass” and Virginia’s Brand of Violence

Bombardments, assaults, volley-fire, flank attacks -- this is the vocabulary of Virginia’s bellicose imagination. It's also an apt lexicon for describing Lamb of God’s catalog.

READ more
Filmmaker as Prism: An Interview With Terence Davies of ‘A Quiet Passion’

Davies reflects on his response to Emily Dickinson's work and the echoes of the poet within himself.

READ more
Alfred Hitchcock May Be a Moralist, but He Does Not Moralize

Hitchcock’s Moral Gaze argues that Hitchcock examined the darkest edges of his characters to help his audience understand their connection with the act of watching, gazing, and sometimes not connecting.

READ more
More Recent Features

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Pilot X Puts a Crimp on the Business in 'The Mysterious Airman'

// Short Ends and Leader

"Mystery writer Arthur B. Reeve's influence in this film doesn't follow convention -- it follows his invention.

READ the article