Recent Features

2 Jul 2012 // 10:20 PM

Live Fast Die Young: Misadventures in Rock ‘n’ Roll America

A tale of friendship tested to the limit, noble myths, love lost and found, perfect lyrics, and good times as two friends from London drive across the US to pay homage to the roots of Rock and Roll.

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Go-Go Live: The Musical Life and Death of a Chocolate City

At the peak of its popularity, go-go could be heard around the US capital every night of the week, on college campuses and in crumbling historic theaters, hole-in-the-wall nightclubs, back yards, and city parks.

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What It Means to Be Human: ‘Never Let Me Go’’

The film, Never Let Me Go, follows the book relatively well, although it eliminates some of the story, and isn't able to mirror the novel's careful and timed revelations about the mystery of Hailsham's students.

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Satisfaction Not Guaranteed: Dilemmas of Progress in Modern Society

Employing his trademark inquiry of emotions in American history, Peter Stearns asks why, if modern life has been generally characterized by measurable themes of progress, abundance, and improvement, are people not happier or more content with their lot in life?

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The Politics of American Perceptions

If Republicans and Democrats were in a street fight, who would win? Beyond Red and Blue is the rare book that gracefully helps you see the legitimacy of the other side of your sacred political beliefs.

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An Early Moan from the Great Moaner: Jack Kerouac’s ‘The Sea Is My Brother’

Jack Kerouac’s greatest achievement is the creation of the most compassionate of 20th century literatures; not just the adolescent fraternalisms or calls for equality, but the glee of rushing down the mountain with the good news, or as the good news, curious about humanity, forgiving, ready to report well and true.

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14 Jun 2012 // 10:10 PM

America, You Sexy Bitch: A Love Letter to Freedom

Meghan McCain and Michael Ian Black barely know each other. But they are about to change the way politics are discussed in America. Or at least the way politics are discussed in their crappy RV on this month-long road trip.

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Post-Black, Post-Racial… Post-Trayvon

The sense that a cohesion of group identity was no longer a defining factor of black life had taken a firm hold in America. Then Trayvon Martin was killed.

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Who Authenticates the Blogged Word? The Publishers or the Readers?

Is the publishing industry steering the reading masses towards blogs? Or is the groundswell in the blogger’s popularity amongst readers forcing publishers to take note?

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The Day the World Discovered the Sun: An Extraordinary Story of 18th-Century Scientific Adventure

Herein are the tales of three dangerous Venus Transit voyages that risked every mortal peril—a quest that raced to an unforgettable climax, when the universe suddenly became much larger than anyone had dared to imagine.

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Sherlock Holmes, Dirk Gently and the Case of the Eccentric Detective

With two TV shows returning Arthur Conan Doyle's creation to our screens, Sherlock Holmes has never seemed more influential. But for the good of detective fiction, it might be time to look elsewhere for our unorthodox investigators...

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Patriot of Persia: Muhammad Mossadegh and a Tragic Anglo-American Coup

In 1953, the American and British intelligence agencies launched a coup in Iran against a bedridden 72-year-old man. Muhammad Mossadegh's crimes had been to flirt with communism and to nationalize his country's oil industry, which for 40 years had been in British hands. Mossadegh must go.

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21 May 2012 // 10:00 PM

Charles Dickens Through the Lens of Canonicity

Critical discourse on Charles Dickens – especially late Dickens, most especially of all Bleak House – has gotten out of hand, and finds itself concentrating on virtues that Dickens doesn’t actually possess in a bid to shoehorn him into our notion of what a great writer is and what his writing does.

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The Ball: Discovering the Object of the Game

Anthropologist John Fox sets off on a worldwide adventure to the farthest reaches of the globe and the deepest recesses of our ancient past to answer a question inspired by his sports-loving son: "Why do we play ball?"

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Sergio Leone: Something to Do with Death

Britain’s pop culture knight, Christopher Frayling, offers the definitive biography and interpretation of the Spaghetti Western maestro, Sergio Leone.

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20 Questions: Kate Bornstein

"I was a Scientologist for 12 years, which is a lot more embarrassing than saying Hi, I’m a transsexual SM dyke living with borderline personality disorder," Kate Bornstein tells PopMatters 20 Questions on the release of her memoir, A Queer and Pleasant Danger.

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Systemic and Subjective: The Violence of ‘The International’ and the Global Financial Order

The weapons deals in The International and the back-door negotiations between corporate lobbies and Congress are two sides of the same coin; both use overwhelming systemic violence to further their ends.

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Fat, Drunk, and Stupid: The Inside Story Behind the Making of Animal House

In 1976 the creators of National Lampoon, America’s most popular humor magazine, decided to make a movie.

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International Beats: The Desire for the Foreign in Kerouac’s ‘On the Road’

With the film adaptation of On the Road just a month away, it's important to once again define what characterized the Beat movement: an infatuation with the foreign.

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2 May 2012 // 10:00 PM

Seeing the Light: Inside the Velvet Underground

With exclusive new interviews from Velvet Underground, this is a captivating account of one of the most influential groups in rock history.

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More Recent Features
//Mixed media
//Blogs

'Cube Escape' Is Free, Frustrating, and Weirdly Compelling

// Moving Pixels

"The Cube Escape games are awful puzzle games, but they're an addicting descent into madness.

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