Recent Features

31 Jan 2011 // 10:00 PM

Que Pasa, New York?

How do artists get their work done in other cities of the world? Where is it viable to live? It's probably silly to begin our investigation in New York. Just 30 years ago, New York was still opening its arms to the tired, poor, huddled masses of creatives. But now?

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24 Jan 2011 // 10:00 PM

The Best Fiction of 2010

Tucked into this wide-ranging list of comics collections, retro-inspired literature and cross-overs, are glimmers of something sweet, something to temper the usual Literary Drearies we all love and appreciate. And that’s just the way it should be.

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The Best Non-Fiction of 2010

PopMatters' writers (a margin-friendly, iconoclastic bunch, for the most part) cast their nets far beyond the world of culture-production to capture some of the best non-fiction books published in 2010.

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A is for Axe: The Filmic Butchering of ‘The Scarlet Letter’

As is often the case with classics, what could have been a brilliantly updated film adaptation of The Scarlet Letter was consumed by the Hollywood machine that instead spits out a shallow and action-packed romp with a glossed-over ending.

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13 Jan 2011 // 10:00 PM

Rescripting the Western in ‘No Country for Old Men’

How the Coen Brothers' ostensibly faithful award winning adaptation of Cormac McCarthy's No Country For Old Men diverges from its creator's rather questionable politics.

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Lil’ Pookie’s America: Some Big Shoes to Fill

How can a kid from the 'hood today measure up to the likes of Duke Ellington? or Hank Aaron? A mythical boy from the 'hood meets these major black American figures through three recent books: 'Duke Ellington's America', 'The Last Hero' and 'Willie Mays'.

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Can You Hear Me Now? The ‘Last Speakers’ Dilemma

People, places, and languages of our recent past are replaced by strip malls where Chinese porn store and Indian restaurant owners speak fluid Spanish, and Ethiopian-slash-Italian restaurants thrive next to Honduran and Venezuelan hot spots.

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‘The Sentimentalists’ Is a Novel That Lives Up to Its Title

The Sentimentalists has all of the hallmarks of a book published in Canada circa 1972, full of purple prose, a seemingly anti-American tract, and a classic rural setting, aka: Can-Lit.

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Lost and Found in Russia: Lives in the Post-Soviet Landscape

This is the story of a nation going through a nervous breakdown, pulling through, but paying the price. It's about a people lost and found, about their search for meaning.

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9 Jan 2011 // 10:00 PM

Birthered in the U.S.A.

Every time Anderson Cooper cornered Leo Berman on his refusal to accept the abundant evidence about Obama’s Hawaiian birth, Berman changed the subject—right back to his original, hopeless claim.

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4 Jan 2011 // 10:00 PM

Memoirs of a Geezer: Music, Mayhem, Life

One of my first memories of watching TV consisted of seeing a performance by the Rolling Stones... My dad and my mum’s brother Johnny were in the living room having a beer... They both went totally mental.

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Deciphering the Jay-Z Code

He's got 99 problems but a book ain't one. Jay-Z's nonlinear memoir illuminates rap as personal narrative, lyric poetry, and transformative medium.

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23 Dec 2010 // 10:00 PM

Clash City

Marcus Gray's book about London Calling inspires a journey around the London of the Clash. There's a huge sense of disaffection in this city, a feeling that the government protects only the rich and will leave the poor to suffer the recession – it’s like 1979 all over again, and London is still calling, calling out into an atmosphere of impending catastrophe.

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15 Dec 2010 // 10:00 PM

Who Owns Punk History?

A folkloric examination of the interview manuscripts of punk historian Jon Savage and The England's Dreaming Tapes.

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20 Questions: James McManus

James McManus is one of those writers who can write about any topic and no matter the subject, and you'll be hooked. But you don’t have to be a gambler to get caught up in the thrill of Cowboys Full: The Story of Poker. He hooks us here at PopMatters 20 Questions.

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None Are So Blind As Those Who Will Not See: ‘The Mind’s Eye’ by Oliver Sacks

In this telling of his own encounter with blindness, the neurologist and author Oliver Sacks reminds us that there are few human failings worse than taking for granted life and its manifold hidden miracles.

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‘Life’: Ladies and Gentlemen, the Rolling Stone

Because Keith Richards lived the book he’s written, he’s written a book that lives on.

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Hip-Hop’s Laboratory of Language

What do William Wordsworth, Robert Frost, Ice Cube, and Ghostface Killah have in common? Finally, they all appear in anthologies.

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Rosanne Cash: More Than Just a Legend’s Daughter

Rosanne Cash’s lyricism plays on the page as if she’s on stage with guitar in hand. You can hear the music as you read. PopMatters Jaime Karnes talks with this gifted writer of songs and stories.

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Hüsker Dü: The Story of the Noise-Pop Pioneers Who Launched Modern Rock

What the world really needs is a straight-up account of one of the most important rock groups of all time. Now we have it in the form of music scribe Andrew Earles.

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More Recent Features
//Mixed media
//Blogs

Anderson East Ignites a Fire at Mercury Lounge

// Notes from the Road

"Hot off the release of his album Delilah Anderson East's performance was full of vim and vigor.

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