Recent Features
20 Questions: Sam Hoffman

Sam Hoffman is the author of Old Jews Telling Jokes, based on the enormously popular website of the same name. He has worked with such legends as Woody Allen and has produced, directed, and assistant-directed movies such as The Royal Tenenbaums, School of Rock, Dead Man Walking, Groundhog Day, and Curse of the Jade Scorpion.

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Bring on the Books for Everyone: How Literary Culture Became Popular Culture

Apparently, the love of literature can now be fully experienced only outside the academy and the New York literary scene, out there somewhere in the wilds of popular culture.

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20 Questions: Tao Lin

American poet, novelist, short story writer, and artist Tao Lin’s new book, Richard Yates releases this week. Lin tells PopMatters 20 Questions that he’s never hired a hit man, or been on a spa vacation, or used Prozac. Honestly.

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For Tomorrow: William Gibson, ‘Zero History’ and The Present… The Interview

William Gibson's recent Zero History, rounds out a trilogy of novels that began in the wake of the 911 terror attacks, and spanned the decade. In a meditative encounter with PopMatters, Gibson shares his thoughts on Zero History, the Bigend Trilogy, and the enduring present.

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Ironically Facebook and Its 500 Million Friends Remain Largely a Mystery

In the beginning, Mark Zuckerberg was a socially-awkward teenager, a computer science major at Harvard University, who arrived toting an eight-foot-long whiteboard as a brainstorming tool...

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Philosophical Tactics in International Soccer

What exactly are Marx, Hegel, Aristotle and Socrates doing after Confucius blows the ref’s whistle? They’re not just thinking about soccer. They’re playing... sort of.

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Brilliant: The Evolution of Artificial Light

Long before there were streetlights, when only the night watchman’s lantern glowed, night travelers who dared defy curfew were forbidden to wear hoods or cloaks, carry weapons, or gather in groups of more than three or four.

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‘Eclipse’: A Sort of Romantic Kind of Fairytale

When I saw Eclipse, a gaggle of teenage girls behind me giggled, gasped and squealed their way through most of the film. Each time their hysteria erupted, it happened during a romantic scene.

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‘The Men Who Would Be King’ Reveals the Stuff That DreamWorks Was Undone By

With energy and a candor reflecting a veteran journalist unworried whether she'll eat lunch in that town again or not, author Nicole LaPorte reveals the parallels between the DreamWorks story and that of any dream's road to either reality or perdition.

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24 Aug 2010 // 10:00 PM

The German Genius: Europe’s Third Renaissance

In 18th century Germany, new beliefs, new tempers, new ways of thinking were taking place. Many of the new ideas transformed Europe and would also transform North America.

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Cults of an Unwitting Oracle: The (Unintended) Religious Legacy of H. P. Lovecraft

A horror writer, self-proclaimed atheist, and "mechanical materialist" who spent most of his life ridiculing religion, H.P. Lovecraft invented one of the most absurd and terrifying pseudomythologies in the history of modern literature. So, how is it that some of his audience came to take his cosmology seriously?

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20 Questions: Vikas Swarup

Slumdog Millionaire author Vikas Swarup's latest, Six Suspects, is out in paperback this month. He confesses to PopMatters 20 Questions that he's sometimes stopped on the streets of the various countries he works in because people mistake him for James Bond.

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Freedom Summer: The Savage Season That Made Mississippi Burn and Made America a Democracy

Two groups met that summer: The first – mostly white – had just finished another year at Harvard, Yale, Oberlin, Berkeley… Guitars slung over shoulders, idealism lifting their strides. The second group – mostly black – brought no guitars and had little idealism left to pack. They arrived with stories of being beaten, targeted, tortured.

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Globish: How the English Language Became the World’s Language

The making of a recognizable Englishness, the painful transition to Anglo-Saxon ‘Englaland’, is a history of four invasions and a cultural revolution… English was a mirror to its island state, an idiosyncratic mixture of splendid isolation and humiliating foreign occupation.

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3 Aug 2010 // 9:59 PM

Feeding an Addiction

Call me a romantic, but after watching so much of that wet and messy business, I crave a less-is-more, simpler, sexier rendition of food porn. Instead, of grotesque, I prefer burlesque and have found that the good stuff isn’t on reality TV.

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2 Aug 2010 // 10:00 PM

Playing the Numbers: Gambling in Harlem between the Wars

Those who controlled the numbers game in Harlem possessed a license to print money. And there, of course, was the rub... Desperately outnumbered and outgunned, she used every conceivable stratagem at her disposal.

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Partial to His Abracadabra: A Discussion of Ian Dury with Biographer Will Birch

On the release of his new book, Ian Dury: The Definitive Biography, Will Birch discusses the complicated glory of the “Upminster Kid".

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Future Shock, Postmodern Nostalgia, and Uncanny Technologies

The speed of technological change is unprecedented. Author Anna Jane Grossman finds that it has imbued her "with a kind of odd nostalgia for right now.”

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22 Jul 2010 // 10:30 PM

A Fierce Radiance

"... the man on the stretcher was dying. His lips were blue from lack of oxygen. His cheeks were hollow, his skin leathery and tight against his bones. His eyes were open but unfocused, like the glass eyes in a box at a doll factory she’d once photographed."

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Manly Love: Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg’s Letters

Kerouac and Ginsberg are cosmic twins borne from Whitman’s Universal skull, bonded as comrades, cerebrally-joined as poets -- but it will sour for Kerouac when Ginsberg uses his poetic voice as a political trump card.

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More Recent Features
//Mixed media
//Blogs

Ubisoft Understands the Art of the Climb

// Moving Pixels

"Ubisoft's Assassin's Creed and Grow Home epitomize the art of the climb.

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