Recent Features
Rooting for Harry Lime: ‘The Third Man’ As Morally Ambiguous Heterotopia

The Third Man's film-noir vision of a fractured postwar landscape creates an ‘other space’ (heterotopia), through which its moral realities and boundaries still resonate.

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5 Oct 2015 // 2:30 AM

The Day Sarah Records Died

I first loved and admired Sarah Records not because it had begun, but because it had ended. It seemed to me ending things took much more courage, strength and self-discipline than beginning them.

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Holding Death Hostage: Human Enigma in ‘The Order of Death’

Hugh Fleetwood's story of murder and guilt evades the clear resolutions of mystery-narratives, opting for a disturbing disquisition on human enigma.

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In France They Kiss on Netflix

What does the French version of Netflix look like? How much gratuitous nudity can you expect to find in the French Netflix catalogue? Isn’t “French movie” code for “mild erotica”, anyway?

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Craven, Freddy, and That Dream in Your Head

Wes Craven let Freddy Krueger into our world. With the director now departed, what remains of his monster in our minds?

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‘Straight Outta Compton’ and the Cyclical Nature of Hollywood: An Interview with Bill Straus

Straight Outta Compton is one of the biggest movies of 2015, and Bill Straus, who got his start as a production assistant on Boyz n the Hood, was essential to getting it to happen. He shares his journey here.

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A Different (and Better) Shade of Grey: Reconsidering ‘9 1/2 Weeks’

Given the mainstream’s preoccupation with kink, it may be time to give 9 ½ Weeks the credit it deserves as a pioneering meditation on desire and power.

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‘Underground’ to ‘Wonderland’: BFI’s ‘London on Film’ Season Celebrates the Nation’s Capital

From Asquith’s Underground (1928) to Winterbottom’s Wonderland (1999), BFI celebrates cinematic representations of the English capital with an ambitious summer season that highlights the city’s continuities and changes.

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Yellow Fever and Yum-Yum Girls

Multiple versions of the classic story The World of Suzie Wong offer different takes on a social phenomenon, but can any of them escape the biases of their authors?

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Ever Wonder Why Netflix Offers Bad Movies? Blame Washington, Not Hollywood

With streaming video making the dissemination of video cheaper and easier, why are most classic domestic and foreign films not widely available via Netflix streaming?

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In Praise of Kristen Wiig’s Risky Career Choices

Kristen Wiig’s genius is that she can generate humor and pathos from the same source, her characters’ pain.

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Singapore’s ‘1965’ Sacrifices a Good Story and History at the Altar of Nationalism

Conflations, copouts, and confusions turn 1965 into a kitschy commemorative paean that will struggle to shrug off accusations of being propaganda.

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The Life, Death and Afterlife of Video Stores

In the dust of long gone video stores ghosts of film geeks past forever roam.

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‘Superman’ and ‘Superman II’: What Is, and What Might Have Been

Superman and Superman II are two of the best films of their kind, but budget and time overruns necessitated a number of changes from the original vision.

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How a Streetwalker Became America’s Sweetheart

Pretty Woman was porn-lite for women long before Fifty Shades of Grey came along, and apparently, it still is.

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Where Have You Gone, Monsieur Hulot?

Persistent themes of Jacques Tati’s films were work and play, two forces in conflicting or complementary relationships, always inspiring creativity regardless of configuration.

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The Fictions of Anxiety in ‘The Last of Philip Banter’

An examination of internalized fears, The Last of Philip Banter explores the social culture of the working-class through a careful dissection of mental illness.

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Building the Perfect Bomb: The Numbers Behind Box Office Flops

The biggest "box office bombs" of all time, much like the biggest hits, are not always the ones you're expecting them to be.

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The Beatles Are Pent-Up Prisoners of Their Own Notoriety in ‘A Hard Day’s Night’

Over 50 years after its release A Hard Day's Night is regarded as a minor classic. It's easy to forget, however, that no one thought the film would ever achieve such stature.

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Paul Verhoeven’s Authenticity Came to Light at Chicago’s Logan Arcade

Some works by Paul Verhoeven, a director known for satire, were shown in an ironic setting this summer. The result was an earnestness soaked in blood.

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More Recent Features
//Mixed media

20 Questions: L'Anarchiste

// Sound Affects

"To say that L'Anarchiste is one of the best bands to emerge out of Salt Lake City makes for an awfully reductive statement, as their Sufjan-inspired brand of soulful folk-rock needs to be heard to be believed.

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