Recent Features
The Funniest Man Who (N)ever Lived: Alan Partridge

For over 20 years, Alan Partridge has shared his life with the British public and fans have embraced him, warts and all. Now, his first feature film is coming to America. Back of the net!

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A Melancholy Never Far Away: An Interview with Jóhann Jóhannsson

PopMatters speaks with Jóhann Jóhannsson about his latest venture into music for cinema, his moody and melancholy score for the police thriller, McCanick.

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The Blackened Eyes of the Movie Men With No Name

Akira Kurosawa’s samurai, Stuart Heisler’s gangster, Sergio Leone’s cowboy, and George Miller’s misfit suffer a similar black eye, but with dramatically different effect.

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24 Feb 2014 // 3:14 AM

The Oscar Curse

For more recent winners who don't have the benefit of the studio system, Oscar can be like a frenemy to them.

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No Greek Tragedy: An Interview with Stathis Papadopoulos

Greek actor Stathis Papadopoulos was poised to be the next big thing in Greek cinema following his bold and equally sensitive turn in Constantine Giannaris' From the Edge of the City more than 15 years ago. But Papadopoulos' star never ascended the way it should have.

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60 Nights at the Movies: The Sequel

The success of Canon Fodder's "50 Nights at the Movies -- at Home!" Requires a bigger and better sequel. Or at least, a longer one. Might want to make some popcorn before sitting down for this one.

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Instantly Familiar: Hollywood’s Great Duopolies

Ever think Hollywood is making the same films over and over? These many sets of twin films that constitute Hollywood’s Great Duopolies show no signs of stopping.

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America, Slavery, and McQueen and Tarantino’s Two Very Different Movies

12 Years a Slave is every bit as intense as one might imagine, though not completely depressing, whereas Django Unchained aestheticizes its extreme violence.

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We’ve Seen This Movie Before: Trying to Make Sense of Philip Seymour Hoffman

The death of Philip Seymour Hoffman hurts more than the typical "gone too soon" tragedy because we are being robbed of an artist performing at the height of his considerable powers.

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Have a Little Faith in People: Woody Allen, ‘Blue Jasmine’, and Returning to Form

Blue Jasmine goes some way towards restoring our faith in Woody Allen's talent. Against the odds, and late in the game, Woody has hit a home run. He actually has returned to form, this time.

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In Defense of Philip Seymour Hoffman’s Legacy

Lost far too soon, Philip Seymour Hoffman was the single most affecting reason I ever decided to watch movies in the first place.

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What Is Not Erased: Kafka and Lynch and Their Gift of Death

Eraserhead is very much of the same ilk as The Metamorphosis, and could be described to be a dark(er) twin of that novella.

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A Langeducation: 10 Essential Jessica Lange Scenes

Furious smokers, farm wives, iconic theater roles, women on the edge of a nervous breakdown, and a small truckload of little gold statues. Obviously, we are counting down Jessica Lange's 10 greatest scenes.

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Freudian Trip: Why We Still Can’t Get ‘The Shining’ Out of Our Heads

Freud theorized that to experience the uncanny was to awaken intellectual uncertainty. Kubrick's The Shining understands this to a masterful degree.

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The Evil That Men Do Lives After Them

Caesar Must Die and The Act of Killing are experiments that mix fiction and reality in distinct ways in order to investigate the relationship between freedom and violence.

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Eastern Dragons Meet Western Tigers: Wu-Tang Clan’s Debut Helped Asian Films Find a New Audience

Quentin Tarantino himself arguably wouldn’t have been so emboldened to make the Kill Bill films without that fire set forth by the Wu’s debut.

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Cinematic Kaiju: A Worm’s Eye look at Filmdom’s Biggest Monsters

In the sagas of film's biggest monsters, what qualifies as a Kaiju? And does the giant monster have to be a Japanese creation to be considered Kaiju?

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‘The Act of Killing’ and How Not to Get Conned by a Charming Madman

Using Joshua Oppenheimer’s belief in the healing power of performance, mass murderer Anwar Congo creates a masterpiece of guilt and repentance that his director buys hook, line and sinker.

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Monty Python vs. the Religious Right

The life of Life of Brian tells us much about a period when disparate cultural values were battled over in a dramatic tug-of-war on the frontlines of society -- and for Monty Python, the threat of prison loomed.

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The Guilty Pleasure Films of 2013

Sometimes, a bad movie inspires a bit of unnatural love. In other instances, films overlooked by the masses make it into our personal preferences. Whatever the case is here, we have several examples of efforts we feel bad for enjoying, but love nonetheless.

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More Recent Features
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Double Take: 'The French Connection' (1971)

// Short Ends and Leader

"You pick your feet in Poughkeepsie, and we pick The French Connection for Double Take #18.

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