Recent Features
All These Women: PopMatters Talks with Woody Allen and Cast

Woody Allen’s philosophy is to give filmgoers something to believe in; Gemma Jones, Freida Pinto, and Lucy Punch talk with PopMatters about their part in delivering that message in You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger

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Part Four: Gena Rowlands to Evan Rachel Wood

She speaks volumes using downward glances and a few nervous ticks; she's regal, and elegant but also tinged with sweetness and vulnerability; she's volcanic, ribald, and just a little maladroit; she's a vulgarian!; she makes character acting look like performance art...

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Part Three: Diane Keaton to Charlotte Rampling

Woody Allen's lead women serve as bridges between various forms of insanity, provide an air of sophistication and enigma to each role and in one instance, becomes the cold heart at the center of his coldest film: Diane Keaton, Elaine May, Radha Mitchell, Emily Mortimer, Samantha Morton, Geraldine Page and Charlotte Rampling.

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Part Two: Sally Hawkins to Julie Kavner

Woody Allen seems to have a preternatural instinct for discovering intuitively brilliant young actresses such as Sally Hawkins, Barbara Hershey, Mary Beth Hurt,Anjelica Huston, Scarlett Johannson and Julie Kavner.

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Part One: Kirstie Alley to Rebecca Hall

Actors of capable skill, depth and instinct; characters that are neurotic, bitter, and suffer from inner-doubt; the 'foxes' and 'hedgehogs' of Woody Allen's films are portrayed here by Kirstie Alley, Stockard Channing, Patricia Clarkson, Penelope Cruz, Judy Davis, Mia Farrow, Rebecca Hall.

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Masters of the Universe: Oliver Stone’s ‘Wall Street’

In his desire to trump his upper crust "superiors", Gekko's personal ethic could be read as a perverted, ultimately hypocritical form of populist revolt.

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Reconsidering the Oliver Stone Filmography

As Oliver Stone's update to the Wall Street hits theatres, PopMatters is taking a look back at select works by the influential and thought-provoking director.

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The Fall of the Oliver Stone Empire: A Director and His Critics

Until 2004, Oliver Stone could never be accused of shying away from anything. Once he did, the critics pounced.

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It Will All Be Yours: ‘Natural Born Killers’ and the Dead End of Allusion

On the eve of the release of Oliver Stone's new film, Thomas Britt reflects on Stone's Natural Born Killers and the mass murdering mayhem courtesy of the fabulously alliterative, famously insane characters of Mickey and Mallory Knox.

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Gekko As Hero? Hell NO!

Gekko isn't really the kind of noted nasty you love to embrace. Instead, he's everything that's bad in our current economic downturn. He's the target of a Michael Moore documentary, a running gag for Bill Maher's politically incorrect vivisection of the times.

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Just Bill: How and Why to Make a Film About Bill Withers

PopMatters talks with filmmakers Alex Vlack and Damani Baker about their unique look at an unassuming legend, Bill Withers.

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One Man’s Trash…: An Interview With Harmony Korine

First known to filmgoers as the teenage screenwriter of Larry Clark’s 1995 film Kids, Harmony Korine seems to have enjoyed that rarest of things within American cinema: the pursuit of a purely individual, often radically rebellious vision. PopMatters spoke with Korine about his career and his latest film, Trash Humpers.

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20 Questions: David Michôd, Director of ‘Animal Kingdom’

Animal Kingdom is the critically acclaimed feature debut of young Australian director, David Michôd, who has helmed many short films that have made the festival circuit.

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Masterpieces of Silent Film Are Rescued From Obscurity

Underworld, The Last Command, and The Docks of New York are masterpieces of visual storytelling -- human dramas expressed with cinematographic innovation, impeccably realized set design, and an unparalleled grasp of the “bigger picture” of the motion picture.

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Part Four: December 2010

This is it... the last push towards end-of-year accolades, with Darren Aronofsky, David O. Russell, Julian Schnabel and the Coen Brothers all looking for that elusive critic's choice seal of approval.

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‘Word Is Out’‘s Historical Importance Cannot Be Underestimated

Tales of secrecy, discrimination, discovery, bonding, and isolation and loneliness are common, not surprising considering the social and political climate for the LGBT community in the '70s.

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Part Three: November 2010

Things slow down considerably in the rush to Turkey Day, including the latest from Danny Boyle, the House of Mouse, and the always formidable Harry Potter.

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‘Eclipse’: A Sort of Romantic Kind of Fairytale

When I saw Eclipse, a gaggle of teenage girls behind me giggled, gasped and squealed their way through most of the film. Each time their hysteria erupted, it happened during a romantic scene.

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Part Two: October 2010

By the look of the calendar -- and this list of titles - it looks like Hollywood is out to investigate the horrors of vampires, demon children, alien invasion, and the most evil entity of all -- Facebook!

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‘Scott Pilgrim’ and What Movies Mean to Comics

Why do comics readers care about the movies made from their favorite books?

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More Recent Features
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//Blogs

In Defense of the Infinite Universe in 'No Man's Sky'

// Moving Pixels

"The common cries of disappointment that surround No Man’s Sky stem from the exciting idea of an infinite universe clashing with the harsh reality of an infinite universe.

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