Recent Features
“Some of My Best Friends Are in Concentration Camps”: The Absence of Jews in Hitchcock’s WWII Films

Although Hitchcock made several films expressing his opposition to the Nazis, viewing these films leads to the question: Where was any mention of the Jews who were so profoundly affected by the Nazis and WWII?

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Hitchcock 101: Day Four, 1941 - 1943

As the war in Europe raged, Hitchcock remained in the relative safety of his adopted home far from the bombs that rocked his home country, but Hitch put together a series of fascinating movies dealing with themes of betrayal, paranoia, deceit, and the creeping horror of doubt.

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Tea and Scones Suspense: Hitchcock’s “English” Movies of the Early 1940s

Although Hitchcock left Great Britain for the United States in 1939, his first two films -- Rebecca (1940) and Suspicion (1941) -- nonetheless remained set firmly in English. His depiction of English life helped craft perceptions of English life for decades to come.

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Hitchcock 101: Day Three, 1940 - 1941

New to Hollywood, it didn’t take long for Hitchcock to master his surroundings, winning the Best Picture Oscar with his first American film. Then, it was on to a series of iffy studio experiments, including perhaps the most bizarre entry in his oeuvre, a screwball comedy starring Carole Lombard!

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Stop Laughing: A Difference of Laughter Between British and American Hitchcock

While Hitchcock is famous for the humor that he injects into his thrillers, there are striking differences in the humor between his British and American periods.

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Hitchcock 101: Day Two, 1935-1938

In Day Two of our Director Spotlight series on the Master of Suspense, we revisit the four strongest films of Hitchcock’s British period.

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‘Blackmail’ and the Birth of the British Talkies

Originally conceived as a silent film, Blackmail was quickly converted to sound, making it the first British talkie. To accommodate theaters that were not equipped for sound, it was reissued as a silent film. The differences in the two versions are here compared.

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Hitchcock 101: Day One, 1927 - 1934

In today's installment of our retrospective survey of Hitchcock's singular career we revisit his first major statements. Thrillingly, all of Hitchcock's trademark themes and signature moves are visible in these early masterpieces -- an uncanny talent, Hitch arrived, it would seem, fully formed.

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“Get Out of the Shower”: The “Shower Scene” and Hitchcock’s Narrative Style in ‘Psycho’

In Psycho, Alfred Hitchcock subverts the narrative expectations laid out in the early parts of the film, producing something very different from the suspense film that we anticipate.

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‘Psycho’: The Mother of All Horrors

Psycho stands out not only for being one of Alfred Hitchcock's greatest films, it is also one of his most influential, providing both a template and source material for an almost endless succession of later horror films, making it appropriate to identify it as the mother of all horror films.

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‘Shutter Island’: The Fragile Intersection Between Sanity and Insanity

Shutter Island concerns the surrender of one’s own subjective memory and identity to another individual or institution. In order to make that choice -- to become a passive player in someone else’s version of reality -- must one be sane or insane?

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Ending the Exceptional: Convention Defiance in Dennis Hopper’s ‘Easy Rider’

Dennis Hopper's Easy Rider not only defied cinematic and social conventions upon its release in 1969, but also the very idea of American exceptionalism.

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‘Easy Rider’: Dennis Hopper Explains America

Anticipating everything from the Kent State killings to the Branch Davidian siege, Easy Rider distills just how deeply freedom and authority are fundamentally antagonists in America. Sadly, especially in America.

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The Calm Before ‘The Tree of Life’

With The Tree of Life, Terrence Malick, the mysterious director no one knew about save for film buffs, will be on the tip of everybody's tongue come the awards season of 2011.

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The Wig Is Off: ‘Bush Mama’ as a Deconstructive Narrative

Bush Mama tells audiences what the typical Hollywood narratives do not about race, class and gender inequities in America.

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Someone to Watch Over Me: An Interview with Ondi Timoner

Director Ondi Timoner talks to PopMatters about her new film, We Live in Public, and what one-time media mogul Joshua Harris' story reveals about our current obsession with social media and its potential consequences.

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Essential Female Melodrama: ‘The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant’

Endorsed by the esteemed Susan Sontag as among the best films about women, Fassbinder's unique approach to the feminine psyche remains as daring today as it was when released in 1972.

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17 May 2010 // 10:00 PM

Afraid of a Ghost: Inside the ‘All Apologies’ Meme

Why did the Robert-Pattinson-as-Kurt-Cobain myth take in more people than any April Fool? Because it seemed too uncomfortably true to be bullshit.

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17 May 2010 // 10:00 PM

Fear of a Rap Parody

Underrated in the annals of hip-hop cinema, Rusty Cundieff's Fear of a Black Hat is biting and unflinching, and forces hip-hop fans to stare soberly at the culture's flaws and to revisit their own reasons for loving the music.

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Labor of the Mind: An Interview with Jay Holstein and Daniel Kraus

PopMatters investigates the sacred and profane world of Rabbi Jay Holstein, the subject of Daniel Kraus’ newest Work Series documentary, Professor.

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More Recent Features
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Hitchcock's 'Suspicion', 'I Confess' and 'The Wrong Man' Return in Blu-ray

// Short Ends and Leader

"These three films on DVD from Warner Archives showcase different facets of Alfred Hitchcock's brilliance.

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