Recent Features
Forbidden Hollywood’s William Wellman: The Forgotten Man

The 1934 Production Code’s puritanical stance towards sexuality is often highlighted by contemporary historians, but it also held extremely reactionary political mandates that forbade movie representations of conflicts between capital and labor.

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The Beginning of a New Age: Stephan Elliot’s ‘Easy Virtue’

Matt Mazur talks with the filmmakers behind the big screen adaptation of Noël Coward's classic play Easy Virtue about the challenges of translating Coward to film, the strengths of gay filmmakers and, yes, Kristin Scott Thomas.

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Summer Hours: An Interview with Olivier Assayas

Assayas’ newest film Summer Hours, and in fact his entire oeuvre, is consistently magnanimous, in representing a universe of real women and colorful female characters of all ages, races, and socio-economic backgrounds.

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Adoration: In the Eye of the Beholder

Atom Egoyan talks to PopMatters about his newest film, Adoration, an intelligent coming-of-age tale that won’t be making it to the local multiplex anytime soon, but makes for a refreshing, welcome addition to the impending sea of American-made summertime garbage.

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Near Misses and Gems: 2009 Tribeca Film Festival

Selecting just 85 feature films for screening, this year's Tribeca Film Festival increased the quality quotient, cutting the number of embarrassing failures that once studded the schedule like a minefield.

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Who Needs an Oscar Anyway?: Mickey Rourke’s Homeboy

Dismissed as too depressing in 1988, Mickey Rourke's self-penned turn in Homeboy brings an aura of sorrow more nuanced and poetic than that of his celebrated performance in The Wrestler.

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“Timely Look”: Interview with Oliver Irving, director of How to Be

When Oliver Irving began writing How to Be in 2004, he couldn't know that when the film finally premiered at Slamdance four years later, his timing -- and casting of Robert Pattinson as his lead -- would be so fortuitous.

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30 Apr 2009 // 9:00 PM

Like Movies—with Buttons

Like Edwin S. Porter realizing that a series of shots was how you structured a film, games have to abandon the presumption that they need to obey a linear narrative or controlled message and just let the player loose.

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Summer of Same: August 2009

With names like Tarantino, Lee, and Zombie, the final month of the season pulls out all the film geek stops. Still, the only guarantee is familiarity, not freshness.

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Summer of Same: July 2009

In a rare attempt at novelty, July jets along with only Harry Potter and the Ice Age crew sampling continuing series spoils. The rest provide unknown pleasures.

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‘Breakfast at Tiffany’s’: Check, Please

I hate it when a film takes a brilliant literary work and turns it into what it thinks the literary work should be.

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Summer of Same: June 2009

This month's "original" fare offers a take on a Sid and Marty Krofft classic, more battling seizure robots, and the retaking of '70s subway thriller. Everything old is new again.

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Summer of Same: May 2009

May's titles include the fourth films in two aging franchises, more Pixar perfection, and the reboot of a TV series from 40 years ago. And they say there are no new ideas.

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Dirty Harry: Nothing Wrong with Shooting the Right People

The year Dirty Harry was released (1971) saw several demonstrations of angry cops questioning why criminals had very solid constitutional protections that often interfered with law enforcement work.

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Full Circle: Béla Fleck, Paul Simon & America’s Return to the World Community

Béla Fleck didn't ask to be the Avatar of the New American Culture (avatars never do). He happened to be in the right place at the right time with a banjo and a digital recorder. The remaining dots are ours to connect, and we've begun to connect them.

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On Evas and Angels: Postmodern Fantasy Devotion to Neon Genesis Evangelion

More than a decade after its debut, Neon Genesis Evangelion continues to reign as a cultural icon in Japan. Understanding how it made such a lasting impact gives us a window onto Japanese social history and fandom.

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All the Faith in the World: Holiday

Holiday is the sort of movie that gives those who do know it the satisfyingly superior glow of being in on something really good.

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12 Apr 2009 // 9:00 PM

India Shining?: America’s Indian Moment

Perhaps Slumdog Millionaire is an elaborate, cinematic version of Bobby Jindal. Perhaps Western audiences have so deeply appreciated Boyle's film because it subtly reiterates a symbolic order that is as familiar as colonial conquest.

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20 Questions: Paul Ben-Victor

We learn at PopMatters 20 Questions that in addition to his acting skills, Ben-Victor has a knack for doing wild makeup designs and body art.

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Looking Back at ‘Back to the Future’

The most irreverent, knowing, daring and hippest time travel story of all time has, inevitably and fittingly, become a time capsule.

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More Recent Features
//Mixed media
//Blogs

Eat to Live: The 35th Anniversary of 'Pac-Man'

// Moving Pixels

"The story of Pac-Man is the story of America.

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