Recent Features

20 Mar 2007 // 10:00 PM

All Talk and No Stick

When it comes to drummers, style can briefly eclipse substance. Before you know it, people are coming up to you in bars talking about what a great drummer Don Henley was.

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19 Mar 2007 // 10:00 PM

P.M. Mixtape, Vol. One

Maybe the sun has set on the days of the cassette tape, a format that made you work for your music. Huff, feeling nostalgic for the "fast forward" and "rewind" buttons, makes his own theoretical cassette mix of oddball hip-hop tunes.

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Out of Nowhere: An Interview With Maps

James Chapman's moody, dream-fuzzed songs spent 2006 evolving from home-taped reveries to NME-charting singles. This year, with a new album in the works, a partnership with Bjork soundman Valgeir Sigurdsson, and a rising tide of blog interest, the Northampton (UK) songwriter is poised to move from off the map to off the charts.

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The Rudest, Crudest, Lewdest, Drunkest Band in Christendom

Extreme was the nature of the Macc Lads' music, as was the nature of reactions to it. Within their deftly created insular world, traits of civility, sensitivity, and compromise were anathemas. Therein lay the foundation of their punk-inspired wit.

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13 Mar 2007 // 9:59 PM

The Slip [Boston/Montreal]

The Slip have moved away from years of jazz-inspired instrumentals and towards more traditional pop structures, leading them into exciting new territory and bringing compositional dexterity to their recent pop.

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Bling, Bling, Bia, Bia!: How Hip-Hop Can Survive Beyond Black History Month

If hip-hop is an art, or a larger entity such as a culture, then we must be able to assess it. No body survives unchecked, so what sets hip-hop apart? As its producers and participants, fans and Stans, we must be able to navigate conversations about our actions.

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Complex Music for Everyone: An Interview With Loney, Dear

Emil Svanägen, the Swedish pop auteur otherwise known as Loney, Dear, has no patience at all for minimalism or primitivism or any of the -isms that make music less baroquely abundant than it naturally is. "For me I want to make complex music that everyone can like."

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Celebrating John Coltrane, Personally

Spurred on by a couple of anniversaries, a new podcast "Traneumentary", and plenty of memory, Layman reflects on the music and meaning of John Coltrane.

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Eggs, Tea, and a Georgia Peach: An Interview with Gregg Allman

The way things have gone, Allman explains, he might have been better off as a dentist.

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Mob Rule: An Interview with Kaiser Chiefs

Keyboardist Nick Baines explains the rise from peanuts to festivals.

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The Stooges take 34 years off and become punk legends

The Stooges once made groundbreaking, life-altering music, and they paid dearly for it. Now more than three decades after they came and went, the Stooges have returned, acknowledged as legends and basking in unprecedented respect, adulation and cash.

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5 Mar 2007 // 8:00 PM

Jamie, Take a Bow

Jamie Stewart, front man for noise-rock confessional Xiu Xiu, goes beyond therapy on his new album, The Air Force.

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5 Mar 2007 // 7:59 PM

Band of the Year: An Interview with Arcade Fire

The artistic license offered by an indie label led to the darker and more ambitious Neon Bible. It brims with arrangements that include a symphony orchestra and a choir recorded in Budapest, Hungary, and a massive church organ. "It felt sometimes like we were making a film rather than a record," Win Butler says.

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The Revolution Will Not Be in a Stadium

If the Chinese revolution has a soundtrack, it won't be the Rolling Stones' songs; especially given that their ticket prices are more than most Chinese can afford.

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28 Feb 2007 // 7:59 PM

Samba is the Heartbeat of Brazil

Samba, with its distinctive, floating downbeat, is a product of warm, sunny places. At its core, driven by percussion, samba has African roots, but like Brazil itself, samba is a stew of other places.

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Such Nice Boys: An Interview With Terry Six

Two years after the tragic automobile accident that killed three of his bandmates, surviving Exploding Hearts guitarist Terry Six is back with a new power pop/glam-rocking band called the Nice Boys. "I came to realize that I'm not sure I know how to do anything else but play music and write music and love music," said Six. "That's all I can do."

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26 Feb 2007 // 8:00 PM

Rumi-nating on a New Axis

The Sufi poet formerly known as Mawlana Jalal ad-Din Muhammad Rumi is celebrating 800 years, and the entire spectrum of Persian culture is throwing a party.

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Sister Rosetta Tharpe got rock rolling long before Elvis

The late, great Sister Rosetta Tharpe was a one-of-a-kind pioneer of 20th-century American music.

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25 Feb 2007 // 8:00 PM

Now Hear This: Patrick Wolf [London]

Flamboyant, extravagant, even audacious, Patrick Wolf's public image may have garnered him some notoriety, but it's his skill with songcraft that has won him praise. Now Wolf stands poised to tackle the mainstream with his forthcoming The Magic Position.

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22 Feb 2007 // 8:00 PM

MacGuffin Pop

Randy Newman's latest Academy Award nomination makes it easy to forget how truly deceptive his songwriting really is. His music, which rarely wanders far from New Orleans R&B, ragtime, or Brill Building pop, is the stuff of familiarity and comfort, an unassuming foundation of Americana into which subversive (confrontational, even) ideas can be planted.

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More Recent Features
//Mixed media
//Blogs

Hozier + Death Cab for Cutie + Rock Radio 104.5's Birthday Show (Photo Gallery)

// Notes from the Road

"Radio 104.5's birthday show featured great bands and might have been the unofficial start of summer festival season in the Northeast.

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