Recent Features
In Defense of ‘Breaking Bad’s’ Skyler White

Given the amount of loathing the character has had to endure in Breaking Bad, few realize that Skyler is so much more than what she appears to be.

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Breaking Bad Frame-By-Frame: Season Four

Breaking Bad's Fourth Season may also be considered by some to be the slowest, but that's largely because after an explosive opening, things slowly burn and simmer until the stunning reveal of "Crawl Space" and the terror that follows it.

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Breaking Bad Frame-By-Frame: Season Three

Gus Fring. The Cousins. Poor, poor Gale. As the stakes increase, so do the perils (and number of flies), and Walt soon realizes that he's under the command one of the most terrifying villains in television history.

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Thomas Golubic: The Master of the Scene

Breaking Bad, The Walking Dead, Six Feet Under, The Killing, and now Showtime's Ray Donovan. What do they all have in common? All bear the creative mark of Thomas Golubic, the music supervisor who has been quietly and powerfully shaping the storytelling world of cable television for the past decade.

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When I Heard the Learn’d Astronomer: Gale Boetticher As Alternate-Universe Walt

Few characters in the history of television have arrived as fully and oddly formed as Gale Boetticher did during Breaking Bad's Third Season.

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Breaking Bad Frame-By-Frame: Season Two

After a first season compromised by a Writers Guild strike, Breaking Bad's first "full" season goes deeper, darker, and through a burned pink teddy bear, indicates that something truly horrific is on the horizon.

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I Am the Danger: The Death of Walt and the Rise of Heisenberg

People ask Bryan Cranston where the "rise" of sinister alter-ego Heisenberg comes from. He says from the first episode, when he tried to be someone else. Yet the dark truths of his journey downhill reveal so much more.

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Breaking Bad Frame-By-Frame: Season One

Breaking Bad starts in the way that any truly great show should start: with a pair of pants falling from the sky ...

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In Defense of Netflix Being the Future of Television

The Little Red Envelope That Could has established itself as a go-to place for quality original programming. The next step? World domination.

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Silence Is Compliance: HBO’s ‘The Cheshire Murders’

With their documentary on a tragic crime premiering on HBO, filmmakers David Heilbroner and Kate David talk with PopMatters about the film, their findings, and what compelled them to tell this intriguing story in the first place.

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Lady and the Dyke: The Queer Possibilities of ‘Downton Abbey’

The great house dramas, which mix nostalgia for archaic politics with rural prejudice, are a curious venue to explore queer history.

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Introducing a Man Who Needs No Introduction: Count Arthur Strong

Never has a grumpy, bumbling, miserly, forgetful, and formerly marginally famous variety star been so lovably hilarious.

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Is ‘The Simpsons’ TV’s Most Sacred Show?

The Simpsons has always taken topical roads less traveled and nowhere is this more apparent than in its regular engagement of personal, institutional, and social issues surrounding religion.

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Bees and Birds and Bluths, Oh My…: ‘Arrested Development’ Season 4

Torn apart, but narratively stitched back together through the affection of its fans and creators, the Bluths and Arrested Development hang suspended in a moment of disrepair, the beating heart of their sorrow exposed, but yearning always to reconnect.

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Lessons British TV Needs to Learn from US TV

British television viewers are hungry for cutting edge programs -- most only available legally in the United States. But will the BBC listen?

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The Way We Watch Television: ‘Sherlock’ By the Numbers

A survey of Sherlock fans supports what broadcasters have long suspected: international viewers won't wait for new episodes on cable when the Internet is oh, so close to home.

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12 Jun 2013 // 11:14 PM

Will Netflix Kill TV?

Netflix is such a beautiful service that it’s terrifying. It’s given us everything we ever wanted, and one day we’ll look back on what a tragedy that was.

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Why ‘Game of Thrones’ Matters

George R.R. Martin's series looks and feels like a historical drama, except the audience doesn't know how the story will turn out. Martin's 'fantasy' is preoccupied with power -- its relations, differentials and dynamics -- because he's interested in the way 'history' is really made.

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Aaron Sorkin’s Millennial Problem in ‘The Newsroom’

The Newsroom isn’t just Sorkin’s follow-up to the hyped-then-failed Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip; it’s his argument that the current generation has almost irrevocably maligned public discourse, and as a result America needs a savior. Enter: Will McAvoy.

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Tomorrow Belongs to Her: The Art That Rose Against Thatcher

Margaret Thatcher is dead, yet her influence is stronger than ever. What lessons can be drawn from the cultural response to Thatcherism, and can they be applied again?

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More Recent Features
//Mixed media
//Blogs

In Defense of the Infinite Universe in 'No Man's Sky'

// Moving Pixels

"The common cries of disappointment that surround No Man’s Sky stem from the exciting idea of an infinite universe clashing with the harsh reality of an infinite universe.

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