Call for Essays About Any Aspect of Popular Culture, Present or Past

 
Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Wednesday, Sep 30, 2009
by PopMatters Staff
by Jordan Calinoff
Foreign Policy (29 September 2009)

“Besides a cloud of smoke, sticky keyboards, and the incessant sound of noodle-slurping, nearly every Internet cafe in China has one thing in common: All home pages are set to Baidu.com, China’s dominant search engine. It’s not a coincidence, or even a matter of preference. Back in 2005, when Baidu was just a start-up, company representatives traveled through China persuading Internet cafe owners from Beijing to Kunming to install its toolbar and home page. In addition, it set up alliances with dozens of Internet directory sites, where most first-time Internet users in China start surfing. Now, the vast majority of the online population uses Internet cafes—and the vast majority of searches go through Baidu. Simply put, Baidu knows China. And Google can’t seem to catch up or catch on.”


Latest in Asian Studies

The Fierce Imagination of Haruki Murakami
— Sam Anderson (The New York Times Magazine, 21 October 2011)
Paper Tigers
— Wesley Yang (New York, 8 May 2011)
What's It Like to Be a Tourist in North Korea?
— Christina Larson (Foreign Policy, 16 August 2010)
North Korea’s Comic Propaganda
— Geoffrey Cain (The Diplomat, 17 March 2010)
China’s Cyberposse
— Tom Downey (The New York Times Magazine, 3 March 2010)
Will the Real Chinese Internet Please Stand Up?
— Kate Merkel-Hess and Jeffrey N. Wasserstrom (Dissent Magazine, 11 February 2010)
Where Google Loses
— Jordan Calinoff (Foreign Policy, 29 September 2009)
A New Beat Gives Young Mongolia A Voice, Identity
— Louisa Lim (NPR, October 2009)
Japanese Simplicity
— Roland Kelts (Adbusters, 25 August 2009)

Latest in Business & Economics

What the Great Recession Wrought: The State of the U.S. in 3 Years of Polls
— Ronald Brownstein (The Atlantic, 7 January 2012)
The Clerk, RIP
— Scott Timberg (Salon, 18 December 2011)
In an iTunes Age, Do We Need the Record Store?
— Marc Hogan (Salon, 20 November 2011)
The FP Top 100 Global Thinkers
— Foreign Policy (Foreign Policy, December 2011)
Man of a Hundred Thousand Books
— George Fetherling (Geist, 2011)
Daniel Ek’s Spotify: Music’s Last Best Hope
— Brendan Greeley (Bloomberg Businessweek, 13 July 2011)
Ticketmaster: Rocking the Most Hated Brand in America
— Chuck Salter (Fast Company, 21 June 2011)
Going, Going, Gone: Who Killed the Internet Auction?
— James Surowiecki (Wired, 17 May 2011)
How Roger Ailes Built the Fox News Fear Factory
— Tom Dickinson (Rolling Stone, 25 May 2011)
How Sequels Are Killing the Movie Business
— Roger Ebert (The Daily Beast, 15 May 2011)

Latest in Cyberculture & New Media

The Clerk, RIP
— Scott Timberg (Salon, 18 December 2011)
In an iTunes Age, Do We Need the Record Store?
— Marc Hogan (Salon, 20 November 2011)
Cutting the Cord: How the World's Engineers Built Wi-Fi
— Iljitsch van Beijnum and Jaume Barcelo (Ars Technica, November 2011)
How Google Dominates Us
— James Gleick (The New York Review of Books, 18 August 2011)
Daniel Ek’s Spotify: Music’s Last Best Hope
— Brendan Greeley (Bloomberg Businessweek, 13 July 2011)
How the Internet Transformed the American Rave Scene
— Michaelangelo Matos (The Record (NPR), 11 July 2011)
The Story So Far: What We Know About the Business of Digital Journalism
— Bill Grueskin, Ava Seave, and Lucas Graves (Columbia Journalism Review, 10 May 2011)
Going, Going, Gone: Who Killed the Internet Auction?
— James Surowiecki (Wired, 17 May 2011)
Comments
Now on PopMatters
PM Picks
Announcements

© 1999-2014 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters.com™ and PopMatters™ are trademarks
of PopMatters Media, Inc.

PopMatters is wholly independently owned and operated.