Call for Essays About Any Aspect of Popular Culture, Present or Past

 
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Thursday, Jan 14, 2010
by PopMatters Staff
by Chris Thompson
The Big Money (13 January 2010)

“On July 24, 2009, in Internet cafes throughout China, men and women sat down to log onto the Web and surf. One of their first destinations was Google (GOOG), the second-most popular search engine in the country after Baidu, which receives substantial government support despite the country’s putative embrace of capitalism. Or they hit YouTube for the latest pop song or checked their Gmail accounts or tried to edit a memo on Google Docs. One after another, across tens of thousands of computer screens, they ran into silence.”


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