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Tuesday, Feb 9, 2010
by PopMatters Staff
by Tomasz Kołodziejczak
Words Without Borders (February 2010)

“Polish comics began in 1919 with the publication in the Lvov satirical weekly Szczutek (“Fillip”) of With Fire and Sword; or, The Adventures of Mad Grześ, about a young soldier who battles enemies of Poland on various fronts.  For the next twenty years, the comics market developed slowly but systematically. Comics were published in magazines for both children and adults. Most were imported—among them Prince Valiant, Tarzan, and Mickey Mouse. The range of themes was broad, from propaganda and satire to gore and science fiction to tales for children, and the dominant form was “paracomics”: the text not in balloons but under the pictures, and often in rhyme.”


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