Call for Essays About Any Aspect of Popular Culture, Present or Past

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Tuesday, Feb 16, 2010
by PopMatters Staff
by David Camp
Vanity Fair (March 2010)

“After a wildly prolific decade of screenwriting and directing that made him the king of teen comedy, John Hughes receded from the cinematic landscape, his legend preserved by the classic 80s trilogy of Sixteen Candles, The Breakfast Club, and Ferris Bueller’s Day Off. Following Hughes’s sudden death, at age 59, last summer, the author delves into his intense connections and sudden breaks with his Brat Pack actors, as well as the essential anomaly of his brief Hollywood reign. Plus:Molly Ringwald, Matthew Broderick, and others remember Hughes; a selection of Hughes’s short stories; and a slide show of items in his archives.”


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