Call for Essays About Any Aspect of Popular Culture, Present or Past

 
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Thursday, Apr 1, 2010
by PopMatters Staff
by Hua Hsu
The Atlantic (29 March 2010)

“Insofar as Google Analytics can make you feel good about yourself, Steve Almond must have enjoyed a wonderful week. Anticipation for his upcoming book, Rock and Roll Will Save Your Life, spiked thanks to two op-ed essays thick in a kind of guileless, Average Joe contrarianism. The first, which appeared in last week’s Boston Globe, flogged the long-gimpy horse of music criticism. After confessing to a litany of blind spots during his days as a critic, and then calling bullshit on any institution that would keep him, blind spots and all, gainfully employed, Almond concludes that criticism is essentially “useless.” (“Am I suggesting that music criticism is a pointless exercise? Yeah, I guess I am.”) This isn’t exactly big game hunting: I don’t think I’ve ever heard anyone argue the contrary. Almond’s second piece, published in this weekend’s LA Times, laments the bygone days when we would listen to music with passion and care, before the possibility of the pocket-sized terabyte.”


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