Monday, Apr 5, 2010
by PopMatters Staff
by David J. Prince
The New York Times (1 April 2010)

“From the release of their first single until their bitter breakup two years later, the Specials helped ska music dominate British pop and fashion. Their blend of black and white musical styles and black-and-white-checkered graphics were a multicultural response to punk’s safety pin nihilism. But just as quickly as it spread, ska slipped off the radar, supplanted by the new wave and the synth-pop that would come to define the ’80s, only to be revived yet again by American bands like No Doubt a decade later.”


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