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Sunday, Apr 25, 2010
by PopMatters Staff
by Nicholas Dawidoff
The New York Times Magazine (19 April 2010)

America’s newspaper of record profiles the major indie darlings that are the National as the Brooklyn band is close to releasing its latest eagerly awaited album, High Violet.


“IN THE DEAD of late January, the five members of the band the National were sprawled around a music studio in the attic of a weathered, gray Bridgeport, Conn., mansion. The studio belongs to the National’s producer, Peter Katis, and after many long months of recording and rerecording their fifth album in Brooklyn, where the band members all now live, they had come to Connecticut for an efficient few weeks of mixing. Things were not turning out that way. The National is composed of the identical-twin guitar-playing brothers Bryce and Aaron Dessner; a second pair of brothers, Bryan Devendorf, the drummer, and Scott Devendorf, who usually plays bass; and Matt Berninger, the band’s vocalist. Matt also writes the lyrics. He is tall, with a sturdy jib, cool blue eyes, a three-day reddish blond beard and enough lead-singer swagger to hold his own among all those siblings.”


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