Call for Feature Essays About Any Aspect of Popular Culture, Present or Past

Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Wednesday, Jun 9, 2010
by PopMatters Staff
by Shani O. Hilton
The American Prospect (3 June 2010)

“In March, two of the biggest musical stars in the world, Lady Gaga and Beyoncé Knowles, released the much-anticipated music video for Gaga’s song “Telephone.” The video, which debuted on the E! Channel and online on a Thursday at 11:30 P.M., had 500,000 views in its first 12 hours. (It also pushed Lady Gaga to the fore of Internet video viewing—“Telephone,” coupled with her two previous hits, “Bad Romance” and “Poker Face,” made her the first musical artist to reach 1 billion video views online.) The buzz around the video was a reminder of how much times have changed for women artists. The “Telephone” hype focused on the budget, the fashion, the cameos, and the sets. That the song and video featured two women artists was the least remarkable part.


Thirteen years ago, things were different. Few concert lineups featured two women back-to-back, and radio stations were reluctant to play two female-led songs in a row—even as the Spice Girls’ first album, Spice, went seven times platinum. So, in 1997, singer Sarah McLachlan launched Lilith Fair, a summer concert festival featuring dozens of female performers, most of whom fell into the “adult contemporary” genre. The headliners included Lisa Loeb, Jewel, Fiona Apple, and Tracy Chapman (who was one of very few women of color on any of the stages). In the popular media, Lilith Fair was mocked as “Breast Fest” and “Girlapalooza.” Still, according to organizers, more than 1.5 million people attended the festival over the course of its three-year run.”


Latest in Culture Industry

The Clerk, RIP
— Scott Timberg (Salon, 18 December 2011)
In an iTunes Age, Do We Need the Record Store?
— Marc Hogan (Salon, 20 November 2011)
The Monoculture Is a Myth
— Steve Hyden (Salon, 10 October 2011)
Daniel Ek’s Spotify: Music’s Last Best Hope
— Brendan Greeley (Bloomberg Businessweek, 13 July 2011)
Ticketmaster: Rocking the Most Hated Brand in America
— Chuck Salter (Fast Company, 21 June 2011)
Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom
— Ross Perlin (Guernica, May 2011)
10 Years of the iPod
— Johnny Davis (The Guardian, 18 March 2011)
The Changing Geography of Pop Music
— Richard Florida (The Atlantic, 17 February 2011)
Behind the Music: What Will Google's New Music Service Mean for Artists?
— Helienne Lindvall (The Guardian, 16 September 2010)

Latest in Feminism

Plus-Size Wars
— Ginia Bellafante (The New York Times Magazine, 28 July 2010)
Renaissance Fair: Lilith Fair Is Back, But Do We Still Need It?
— Shani O. Hilton (The American Prospect, 3 June 2010)
Everything and Nothing: An Interview with Alice Walker
— Rudolph P. Byrd (Guernica, April 2010)
Exile from Grrrlville
— Sara Marcus and Marisa Meltzer (Slate, 11 February 2010)
Feminism: What Went Wrong?
— Cassandra Jardine  (Telegraph, 12 January 2010)
Can Anybody Make a Movie for Women?
— Daphne Merkin (The New York Times Magazine, 15 December 2009)
The Bitch (Magazine) Is Back
— Danielle Maestretti (Utne Reader, September 2009)
Girls Gone Wild: How Feisty Females Took Over Pop Culture
—  Julia Keller (Chicago Tribune, 5 July 2009)

Latest in Music

Is This the Twilight of Blues Music?
— Howard Reich (Chicago Tribune, 28 December 2012)
The Clerk, RIP
— Scott Timberg (Salon, 18 December 2011)
In an iTunes Age, Do We Need the Record Store?
— Marc Hogan (Salon, 20 November 2011)
The Monoculture Is a Myth
— Steve Hyden (Salon, 10 October 2011)
How Music Changes Our Brains
— Thomas Rogers (Salon, 23 October 2011)
Is Music Tribalism Dead?
— Vanessa Thorpe (The Observer, 24 July 2011)
Daniel Ek’s Spotify: Music’s Last Best Hope
— Brendan Greeley (Bloomberg Businessweek, 13 July 2011)
Ticketmaster: Rocking the Most Hated Brand in America
— Chuck Salter (Fast Company, 21 June 2011)
When Country Was King
— Elisabeth Greenbaum Kasson (Los Angeles Times Magazine, June 2011)
40 Noises That Built Pop
— Rhodri Marsden (The Word, 9 July 2011)

Latest in Performing Arts

Ticketmaster: Rocking the Most Hated Brand in America
— Chuck Salter (Fast Company, 21 June 2011)
No Money, Mo’ Problems: Why Even Successful Bands Struggle Financially
— Emily Zemler (Alternative Press, 17 January 2010)
Why Aren't More Blacks in the Audience at Broadway Plays?
— E.R. Shipp (The Root, 11 June 2010)
Renaissance Fair: Lilith Fair Is Back, But Do We Still Need It?
— Shani O. Hilton (The American Prospect, 3 June 2010)
Why Good Theatre Should Never Be Confused with Journalism
— David Hare (The Guardian, 17 April 2010)
Audiences Hate Modern Classical Music Because Their Brains Cannot Cope
— Richard Gray (Telegraph, 20 February 2010)
Can Modern Dance Be Preserved?
— Arthur Lubow (The New York Times Magazine, 5 November 2009)
Old Friends: Irving Wardle on Harold Pinter
— Irving Wardle (Intelligent Life, Autumn 2009)
Jazz Festivals and What They Play There
— John G. Rodwan, Jr. (Open Letters Monthly, September 2009)
The Crafty Art of Alan Ayckbourn
— Terry Teachout (Commentary, September 2009)
Comments
Now on PopMatters
PM Picks
Announcements

© 1999-2014 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters.com™ and PopMatters™ are trademarks
of PopMatters Media, Inc.

PopMatters is wholly independently owned and operated.