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Thursday, Oct 7, 2010
by PopMatters Staff
by Susannah Gora
The Washington Post (26 September 2010)

“It’s been 25 years since “a brain, a beauty, a jock, a rebel and a recluse” spent an unforgettable Saturday together in high school detention. But rather than going the way of acid-washed jeans and VHS, “The Breakfast Club” seems to take on more cultural resonance with each passing year, as new generations of teens flock to the movie, finding themselves reflected perfectly onscreen.”


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In this installment, we look at Clash of the Titans (2010), Spartacus, The Breakfast Club, Nanny McPhee, and Greenberg.
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The Breakfast Club remains a defining moment for a generation 25 years later. What endures is the sheer heart that defines the film, the way that it supplies stark, grave candor and quirky spunk in equal measure.
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