Call for Essays About Any Aspect of Popular Culture, Present or Past

 
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Wednesday, Oct 20, 2010
by PopMatters Staff
by Georgie Williamson
The Australian (1 September 2010)

“Much has been written about the revolutionary potential of the internet for criticism. It is ridiculously cheap, blisteringly fast and the online community it engenders is one that thrives on argument and constant to-and-fro. Most significantly, the web breaks the monopoly on criticism once held by analog-era organs and allows everyone to have their say.


Just because the medium allows argument to thrive, however, does not mean that it is ideal for criticism.


For every brilliant new blogger that has emerged, 100 pallid yes-men (and women) have sprung up. And while these bloggers often define themselves against in-house elitists who impose their tastes from above, they have a tendency to move in digital packs, to think as hive minds.”


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— Brendan Greeley (Bloomberg Businessweek, 13 July 2011)
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— James Surowiecki (Wired, 17 May 2011)

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