Tuesday, Apr 19, 2011
by PopMatters Staff
by Burkhard Bilger
The New Yorker (25 April 2011)

“THE POSSIBILIAN… What a brush with death taught David Eagleman about the mysteries of time and the brain… When David Eagleman was eight years old, he fell off a roof and kept on falling. Or so it seemed at the time. His family was living outside Albuquerque, in the foothills of the Sandia Mountains. There were only a few other houses around, scattered among the bunchgrass and the cholla cactus, and a new construction site was the Eagleman boys’ idea of a perfect playground. David and his older brother, Joel, had ridden their dirt bikes to a half-finished adobe house about a quarter of a mile away. When they’d explored the rooms below, David scrambled up a wooden ladder to the roof. He stood there for a few minutes taking in the view—west across desert and subdivision to the city rising in the distance—then walked over the newly laid tar paper to a ledge above the living room. “It looked stiff,” he told me recently. “So I stepped onto the edge of it.”


Latest in Music

Is This the Twilight of Blues Music?
— Howard Reich (Chicago Tribune, 28 December 2012)
The Clerk, RIP
— Scott Timberg (Salon, 18 December 2011)
In an iTunes Age, Do We Need the Record Store?
— Marc Hogan (Salon, 20 November 2011)
The Monoculture Is a Myth
— Steve Hyden (Salon, 10 October 2011)
How Music Changes Our Brains
— Thomas Rogers (Salon, 23 October 2011)
Is Music Tribalism Dead?
— Vanessa Thorpe (The Observer, 24 July 2011)
Daniel Ek’s Spotify: Music’s Last Best Hope
— Brendan Greeley (Bloomberg Businessweek, 13 July 2011)
Ticketmaster: Rocking the Most Hated Brand in America
— Chuck Salter (Fast Company, 21 June 2011)
When Country Was King
— Elisabeth Greenbaum Kasson (Los Angeles Times Magazine, June 2011)
40 Noises That Built Pop
— Rhodri Marsden (The Word, 9 July 2011)

Latest in Science & Technology

Cutting the Cord: How the World's Engineers Built Wi-Fi
— Iljitsch van Beijnum and Jaume Barcelo (Ars Technica, November 2011)
How Music Changes Our Brains
— Thomas Rogers (Salon, 23 October 2011)
How Google Dominates Us
— James Gleick (The New York Review of Books, 18 August 2011)
Can Watching ‘Jackass’ Turn You Into One?
— Tom Jacobs (Miller-McCune, 7 June 2011)
Everyone’s a Critic: Babies Prefer Picasso
— Tom Jacobs (Miller-McCune, 14 June 2011)
Rapture Ready: The Science of Self Delusion
— Chris Mooney (Mother Jones, May 2011)
One Professor’s Attempt to Explain Every Joke Ever
— Joel Warner (Wired, 26 April 2011)
Electronic Devices Redefine Quality Family Time
— Alex Williams (The New York Times, 29 April 2011)
25 Great Books By Legendary Scientists
— Alasdair Wilkins (io9, 20 April 2011)
The Sharing Economy
— Craig Robinson (Fast Company, 18 April 2011)

//comments
//Blogs

Authenticity Issues and the New Intimacies

// Marginal Utility

"The social-media companies have largely succeeded in persuading users of their platforms' neutrality. What we fail to see is that these new identities are no less contingent and dictated to us then the ones circumscribed by tradition; only now the constraints are imposed by for-profit companies in explicit service of gain.

READ the article