Call for Music Writers... Rock, Indie, Urban, Electronic, Americana, Metal, World and More

Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Monday, May 2, 2011
by PopMatters Staff
by Ross Perlin
Guernica (May 2011)

“Each year at Disney World, thousands of interns earn academic credit for flipping burgers or parking cars. Ross Perlin learns about vague assignments, long hours, and the meaning of the phrase “protein spill.”... At Disney World, interns are everywhere. The bellboy carrying luggage up to your room, the monorail “pilot” steering a train at forty miles per hour, the smiling young woman scanning tickets at the gate. They corral visitors into the line for Space Mountain, dust sugar over funnel cakes, sell mouse ears, sweep up candy wrappers. Mickey, Donald, Pluto and the gang may well be interns, boiling in their furry costumes in the Florida heat. Visiting the Magic Kingdom recently, I tried to count them, scanning for the names of colleges on the blue and white name tags that all “cast members” wear. They came from public and private schools, community colleges and famous research universities, from across America. International interns, hailing from at least nineteen different countries, were also out in force. A sophomore from Shanghai greeted customers at the Emporium on Main Street, U.S.A. She was one of hundreds of Chinese interns, she told me, and she was looking forward to “earning her ears.” Disney runs one of the world’s largest internship programs. Each year, between 7,000 and 8,000 college students and recent graduates work full-time, minimum-wage, menial internships at Disney World. Typical stints last four to five months, but the “advantage programs” may last up to seven months.”


Latest in Business & Economics

What the Great Recession Wrought: The State of the U.S. in 3 Years of Polls
— Ronald Brownstein (The Atlantic, 7 January 2012)
The Clerk, RIP
— Scott Timberg (Salon, 18 December 2011)
In an iTunes Age, Do We Need the Record Store?
— Marc Hogan (Salon, 20 November 2011)
The FP Top 100 Global Thinkers
— Foreign Policy (Foreign Policy, December 2011)
Man of a Hundred Thousand Books
— George Fetherling (Geist, 2011)
Daniel Ek’s Spotify: Music’s Last Best Hope
— Brendan Greeley (Bloomberg Businessweek, 13 July 2011)
Ticketmaster: Rocking the Most Hated Brand in America
— Chuck Salter (Fast Company, 21 June 2011)
Going, Going, Gone: Who Killed the Internet Auction?
— James Surowiecki (Wired, 17 May 2011)
How Roger Ailes Built the Fox News Fear Factory
— Tom Dickinson (Rolling Stone, 25 May 2011)
How Sequels Are Killing the Movie Business
— Roger Ebert (The Daily Beast, 15 May 2011)

Latest in Culture Industry

The Clerk, RIP
— Scott Timberg (Salon, 18 December 2011)
In an iTunes Age, Do We Need the Record Store?
— Marc Hogan (Salon, 20 November 2011)
The Monoculture Is a Myth
— Steve Hyden (Salon, 10 October 2011)
Daniel Ek’s Spotify: Music’s Last Best Hope
— Brendan Greeley (Bloomberg Businessweek, 13 July 2011)
Ticketmaster: Rocking the Most Hated Brand in America
— Chuck Salter (Fast Company, 21 June 2011)
Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom
— Ross Perlin (Guernica, May 2011)
10 Years of the iPod
— Johnny Davis (The Guardian, 18 March 2011)
The Changing Geography of Pop Music
— Richard Florida (The Atlantic, 17 February 2011)
Behind the Music: What Will Google's New Music Service Mean for Artists?
— Helienne Lindvall (The Guardian, 16 September 2010)

Latest in Education

The Public Library Manifesto
— David Morris (Yes!, 6 May 2011)
Paper Tigers
— Wesley Yang (New York, 8 May 2011)
Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom
— Ross Perlin (Guernica, May 2011)
A Liberal Education: Should academics Join the Government?
— Martha C. Nussbaum (The New Republic, 11 March 2011)
In Praise of Dead White Men
— Lindsay Johns (Prospect, 23 September 2010)
The University vs. Liberal Education
— Dan Edelstein (Inside Higher Ed, 14 October 2010)
Learning by Playing: Video Games in the Classroom
— Sara Corbett (The New York Times Magazine, 15 September 2010)
The Amazonian Gorilla
— Scott McLemee (Inside Higher Ed, 28 July 2010)
Putting the 'Public' in 'Public Intellectual'
— Imani Perry (The Chronicle of Higher Education, 6 June 2010)
Bad Writing and Bad Thinking
— Rachel Toor (The Chronicle of Higher Education, 15 April 2010)
Comments
Now on PopMatters
PM Picks
Announcements
PopMatters' LUCY Giveaway! in PopMatters's Hangs on LockerDome

© 1999-2014 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters.com™ and PopMatters™ are trademarks
of PopMatters Media, Inc.

PopMatters is wholly independently owned and operated.