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Tuesday, May 10, 2011
by PopMatters Staff
by Alyssa Rosenberg
The Atlantic (10 May 2011)

“Game of Thrones reviewers dismissed the series as appealing only to men. Why they’re wrong…. Bellafante has been taken to task both on the matter of Game of Thrones by critics like io9’s Annalee Newitz, and the Girl Geek section of the Internet for her general lack of exposure to women who can’t imagine joining a book group where Lorrie Moore would ever be in contention for read of the month. But it’s worth exploring something Bellafante appeared unable to even consider as a possibility: The reasons fantasy might be a uniquely appealing genre to women.”


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George R.R. Martin's series looks and feels like a historical drama, except the audience doesn't know how the story will turn out. Martin's 'fantasy' is preoccupied with power -- its relations, differentials and dynamics -- because he's interested in the way 'history' is really made.
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Just what is it that is drawing these new female viewers to a show and genre that has historically been the realm of a largely male audience? It probably has something to do with fact that the women of Game of Thrones are some of the most powerful and dynamic female characters on television right now.
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