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Latest Articles in Business & Economics

Monday, January 9 2012

Monday, December 19 2011

The Clerk, RIP

— Scott Timberg (Salon, 18 December 2011)
Filed in: Business & Economics | Culture Industry | Cyberculture & New Media | Film | Literature | Music

Thursday, December 1 2011

Wednesday, August 10 2011

Man of a Hundred Thousand Books

— George Fetherling (Geist, 2011)
Filed in: Business & Economics | Literature

Monday, July 18 2011

Daniel Ek’s Spotify: Music’s Last Best Hope

— Brendan Greeley (Bloomberg Businessweek, 13 July 2011)
Filed in: Business & Economics | Culture Industry | Cyberculture & New Media | Music

Tuesday, June 21 2011

Friday, May 27 2011

Tuesday, May 17 2011

How Sequels Are Killing the Movie Business

— Roger Ebert (The Daily Beast, 15 May 2011)
Filed in: Business & Economics | Film

Wednesday, May 4 2011

Monday, May 2 2011

Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom
— Ross Perlin (Guernica, May 2011)
Filed in: Business & Economics | Culture Industry | Education

Thursday, April 14 2011

Trouble @Twitter
— Jessi Hempel (Fortune, 14 April 2011)
Filed in: Business & Economics | Cyberculture & New Media | Science & Technology

Friday, March 18 2011

10 Years of the iPod
— Johnny Davis (The Guardian, 18 March 2011)
Filed in: Business & Economics | Culture Industry | Music

Tuesday, March 15 2011

Germany’s New Boom: Making Money by Making Stuff
— Larry Elliott (The Guardian, 14 March 2011)
Filed in: Business & Economics | European Studies

Monday, February 7 2011

Super Bowl Ads Mine Decades of Americana
— Stuart Elliott (The New York Times, 6 February 2011)
Filed in: Business & Economics | Consumerism | Sports | Television
Is the Huffington Post Really Worth $315 Million?
— Emma Barnett (The Telegraph, 7 February 2011)
Filed in: Business & Economics | Cyberculture & New Media | Mass Media

Saturday, January 29 2011

Larry Page’s Google 3.0
— Brad Stone (Business Week, 26 January 2011)
Filed in: Business & Economics | Cyberculture & New Media

Friday, January 21 2011

How the War on Piracy Will Change in 2011
— Andrew Wallenstein (Mashable, 20 January 2010)
Filed in: Business & Economics | Cyberculture & New Media | Music

Tuesday, January 18 2011

No Money, Mo’ Problems: Why Even Successful Bands Struggle Financially
— Emily Zemler (Alternative Press, 17 January 2010)
Filed in: Business & Economics | Music | Performing Arts

Wednesday, November 3 2010

Wednesday, October 20 2010

The Demon Blogger of Fleet Street
— Michael Idov (New York, 26 September 2010)
Filed in: Business & Economics | Cyberculture & New Media | Mass Media

Tuesday, September 21 2010

The Face of Facebook
— Jose Antonio Vargas (The New Yorker, 20 September 2010)
Filed in: Business & Economics | Cyberculture & New Media
With a Little Help From His Friends
— David Kirkpatrick (Vanity Fair, October 2010)
Filed in: Business & Economics | Cyberculture & New Media | Science & Technology

Tuesday, August 17 2010

The Amazonian Gorilla
— Scott McLemee (Inside Higher Ed, 28 July 2010)
Filed in: Business & Economics | Cyberculture & New Media | Education | Literature

Monday, August 2 2010

Why ‘Mad Men’ Has So Little to Do With Advertising
— Brian Steinberg (Advertising Age, 2 August 2010)
Filed in: Business & Economics | Television

Sunday, July 25 2010

The Culture of Wall Street
— KCRW (KCRW, 11 May 2010)
Filed in: Business & Economics

Thursday, July 15 2010

The Trouble at Twitter Inc.
— Ryan Tate (Gawker, 14 July 2010)
Filed in: Business & Economics | Cyberculture & New Media

Saturday, July 10 2010

Sonic Branding: An Earworm to Your Pocket
— BBC News (BBC News, 21 June 2010)
Filed in: Business & Economics | Consumerism | Music
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