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Thursday, January 7 2010

Dave Eggers Interview: The Heartbreak Kid

— John Preston (Telegraph, 29 December 2009)
Filed in: Literature

Arthur C. Clarke and the End of Upbeat Futurology

— Darragh McManus (The Guardian, 4 January 2010)
Filed in: Literature

Wednesday, January 6 2010

Tuesday, January 5 2010

To Have and to Hold

— Matthew Reisz (Times Higher Education, 17 December 2009)
Filed in: Consumerism | Culture Industry | Literature

Monday, January 4 2010

The Editor Strikes Back

— Stuart Evers (The Guardian, 17 December 2009)
Filed in: Culture Industry | Literature

What Books Published in the Past 10 to 15 Years Might Still Be Read a Century from Now?

— Various Authors (The Second Pass, 17 December 2009)
Filed in: Literature

Countering the Myth: Why Self-Publishing Works

— Henry Baum (3:AM Magazine, 2 December 2009)
Filed in: Culture Industry | Literature

The Great Underground Myth: Why Self Publishing Doesn’t Work

— Max Dunbar (3:AM Magazine, 28 November 2009)
Filed in: Culture Industry | Literature

Wednesday, December 9 2009

The Cusp of Every Bibliomaniac’s Dream
— Scott McLemee (Inside Higher Ed, 25 November 2009)
Filed in: Cyberculture & New Media | Literature
Beyond Borders: The Future of Bookselling
— Rachel Cooke (The Observer, 29 November 2009)
Filed in: Business & Economics | Culture Industry | Literature

Tuesday, December 1 2009

Thus Spake Zora
— John H. McWhorter (City Journal, Summer 2009)
Filed in: Ethnicity & Race | Literature
Blues in Stereo: The Texts of Langston Hughes in Jazz Music
— W.S. Tkweme (African American Review, Fall-Winter 2008)
Filed in: Literature | Music

Friday, November 20 2009

The ‘Easy Rider’ Road Trip
— Keith Phipps (Slate, 20 November 2009)
Filed in: Film | Literature
Coming Soon to a Shelf Near You
— Troy Patterson (Slate, 18 November 2009)
Filed in: Culture Industry | Literature

Tuesday, November 17 2009

‘In Cold Blood’, Half a Century On
— Ed Pilkington (The Guardian, 16 November 2009)
Filed in: Literature

Wednesday, November 11 2009

How Waterstone’s Killed Bookselling
— Stuart Jeffries (The Guardian, 10 November 2009)
Filed in: Business & Economics | Culture Industry | Literature
These Foolish Things
— Michael Dirda (In Character, Fall 2009)
Filed in: General Culture | Literature

Monday, November 9 2009

Grime and Punishment
— John Thornhill  (Financial Times, 30 October 2009)
Filed in: European Studies | Literature
The Word Made Full-Figured
— Brad Jones (Open Letters Monthly, November 2009)
Filed in: Comics | Literature

Wednesday, November 4 2009

The Rise of the Neuronovel
— Marco Roth (n+1, 18 October 2009)
Filed in: Literature | Science & Technology
Monsters and the Moral Imagination
— Stephen T. Asma (The Chronicle of Higher Education, 25 October 2009)
Filed in: Film | General Culture | Literature

Monday, November 2 2009

The Book That Contains All Books
— Stephen Marche (Wall Street Journal, 17 October 2009)
Filed in: Culture Industry | Digital & Gaming | Literature

Monday, October 26 2009

Magic Words: How Maurice Sendak Unleashed a Multimedia Monster With 10 Little Sentences
— Lauren F. Friedman (Philadelphia Citypaper, 14 October 2009)
Filed in: Film | Literature
Misremembering Jack Kerouac
— David Barnett (The Guardian, 21 October 2009)
Filed in: Literature

Saturday, October 17 2009

The Last Writes
— D J Taylor (New Statesman, 8 October 2009)
Filed in: Criticism | Literature
Three Tweets for the Web
— Tyler Cowen (The Wilson Quarterly, Autumn 2009)
Filed in: Culture Industry | Cyberculture & New Media | Literature
Southern Discomfort
— Dan Halpern (The New York Times Magazine, 14 October 2009)
Filed in: American Studies | Literature
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//Blogs

NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

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