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Latest Articles in Television

Thursday, December 1 2011

Please Chuckle Here: The Return of the Sitcom Laugh Track

— Josef Adalian (New York, 27 November 2011)
Filed in: Television

The Monoculture Is a Myth

— Steve Hyden (Salon, 10 October 2011)
Filed in: Culture Industry | General Culture | Music | Television

Tuesday, July 12 2011

Wednesday, June 1 2011

Filmmaker J. J. Abrams Is a Crowd Teaser

— Frank Bruni (The New York Times Magazine, 26 May 2011)
Filed in: Film | Television

Friday, May 27 2011

Sunday, May 22 2011

Sing for Your Life

— Daniel Bergner (The New York Times Magazine, 19 May 2011)
Filed in: Music | Television

We Are All Teenage Werewolves

— Alex Pappademas (The New York Times Magazine, 22 May 2011)
Filed in: General Culture | Television

Tuesday, May 10 2011

Why Women Love Fantasy Literature

— Alyssa Rosenberg (The Atlantic, 10 May 2011)
Filed in: Gender | Literature | Television

Thursday, April 28 2011

What’s Behind the Dearth of Female ‘American Idol’ Finalists?

— Ann Powers (Los Angeles Times, 27 April 2011)
Filed in: Music | Television

Tuesday, April 26 2011

“Treme” Untangles the Lessons of Trauma

— Matt Zoller Seitz (Salon, 25 April 2011)
Filed in: Television

Tuesday, April 5 2011

Save NPR! But Please, Put PBS Out of Its Misery
— Mark Oppenheimer (Slate, 5 April 2011)
Filed in: Mass Media | Politics & Government | Television

Tuesday, March 29 2011

TV’s 100 Most Influential Shows
— Adweek (Adweek, 28 March 2011)
Filed in: History | Television

Monday, March 21 2011

Big Mama vs. Mama Grizzly
— Jessica Grose (Slate, 18 March 2011)
Filed in: Politics & Government | Television

Wednesday, March 16 2011

Charlie Sheen Is Winning
— Bret Easton Ellis (The Daily Beast, 12 March 2011)
Filed in: Celebrity Culture | General Culture | Television

Tuesday, March 15 2011

Monday, February 7 2011

Super Bowl Ads Mine Decades of Americana
— Stuart Elliott (The New York Times, 6 February 2011)
Filed in: Business & Economics | Consumerism | Sports | Television

Tuesday, January 25 2011

Is Cable News Going to Get Sorkin-ized?
— James Poniewozik (Time, 24 January 2011)
Filed in: Mass Media | Television

Saturday, December 18 2010

The Guardian’s Guide to the Culture of 2010
— The Guardian (The Guardian, December 2010)
Filed in: Digital & Gaming | Film | General Culture | Music | Television

Tuesday, November 16 2010

Wednesday, November 3 2010

Wednesday, October 27 2010

The Comedy Writer That Helped Elect Richard M. Nixon
— Kliph Nesteroff (WFMU, 19 September 2010)
Filed in: Politics & Government | Television

Friday, October 8 2010

The Strange Universe of Science Fiction Novelty Records
— Charlie Jane Anders (io9, 7 October 2010)
Filed in: Film | Music | Television

Tuesday, August 3 2010

The Age of Laura Linney
— Frank Bruni (The New York Times Magazine, 28 July 2010)
Filed in: Film | Television

Monday, August 2 2010

Why ‘Mad Men’ Has So Little to Do With Advertising
— Brian Steinberg (Advertising Age, 2 August 2010)
Filed in: Business & Economics | Television

Sunday, July 25 2010

Bravo’s ‘Work of Art’ (audio)
— KCRW (KCRW, 22 June 2010)
Filed in: Television | Visual Arts

Wednesday, July 7 2010

Rotten to the Core: The Squishy, Smelly, Bloody Reality of Zombie Porn
— Michelle Castillo (New York Press, 26 May 2010)
Filed in: Film | Television

Tuesday, June 29 2010

The Unbearable Whiteness of Cable
— Rachel Sklar (The Daily Beast, 24 June 2010)
Filed in: Mass Media | Television

Wednesday, June 16 2010

Why “Top Chef” Gets Me Cooking
— Allen St. John (Salon, 16 June 2010)
Filed in: Food | Television

Wednesday, June 2 2010

Is the Daytime Talk-Show Dead?
— Jessica Grose (Slate, 2 June 2010)
Filed in: Television

Thursday, May 27 2010

The Enduring Legacy of ‘24’
— Hampton Stevens (The Atlantic, 24 May 2010)
Filed in: Television
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//Blogs

NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

READ the article