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30 Musical, Literary and Cultural Reasons to Celebrate 30 More Years of Phish: Part Two
By Katherine Factor
From Romanticism to structuralism, the musical ingenuity of Phish pays tribute to a variety of cultural movements; they're more dada than dad rock. [27.Mar.15]
Counterbalance: The Who's 'The Who Sell Out'
What's for tea, darling? Darling, I said, What's for tea? It's a 1967 pop-art masterpiece. You're going to choke on it, too. A pioneer in the art of the concept album is this week's Counterbalance. [27.Mar.15]
Liturgy: The Ark Work
Religious music, black metal, electronic, and 8-bit all come together in this bizarre yet ultimately captivating philosophical tome from Liturgy. [27.Mar.15]
Zu: Cortar Todo
It roars, dilutes, squeals, shrieks, pulsates and squawks. Welcome to the world of Zu. [27.Mar.15]
The Artist Is Not Present: The Significance of Sia's Anti-Pop Persona
For once, a pop artist has rejected the idea of stardom, and as a result, has become one of the world’s most discussed pop stars. [26.Mar.15]
Reviews
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Religious music, black metal, electronic, and 8-bit all come together in this bizarre yet ultimately captivating philosophical tome from Liturgy.
It roars, dilutes, squeals, shrieks, pulsates and squawks. Welcome to the world of Zu.
Chastity Belt brings the '90s nostalgia, but forgets to bring the variety along with it.
Pug fought through some tough times to produce this optimistic, rewarding record.
The candor of Bingham on Bingham reveals an intimate portrait of love and hope on Fear and Saturday Night.
True to its name, Vibes comes chock-full of different vibes for different situations.
The eclectic guitar becomes a tool that complements Laura Marling's lyrics on this pivotal album, at times articulating visceral anger and, at others, obliterating psychic barriers and clearing space for something new.
With heavier rock influence and toned-down electronic methodology, The Scene Between represents the Go! Team's greatest deviation from their original template yet.
Goon isn’t great, but it is a fine example of what might evolve from pure pop purpose.
Andrew Combs is either ignorant of or recording in deference to the past by rekindling the gilded countrypolitan spirit on his sophomore release, All These Dreams.
The Booster series wraps up as the world bids farewell to Edgar Froese.
There's an innovative sound happening here, with many tracks sounding like they came from the soundtrack of some dystopian sci-fi world or even just the dark Orwellian future that’s currently on Earth’s horizon right here in 2015.
Earl Sweatshirt leaves shock horror behind and finds something much better on his brilliant third album.
In the end, this is exactly what we have come to expect from Lightning Bolt; a set list of fuzzy, overwhelming, noise rock that keeps it simple while never missing its target.
Tulsa speaks to more than the desolate environs its sound sometimes suggests.
Distressing, awkward, disturbing and almost upsetting, this aura of discomfort, if combined with the sound of the term itself (|ˈkɒntrətɒ̃|) is the essence of the music presented by Joel Ebner.
Junior Wells and his men straddle two decades and lay down 15 gems.
Forgoing the obvious hits and contemporary pop star collaborators, iconoclast Van Morrison raises the bar for what duet albums can and should be.
The assortment of different tunes here suggests McKay understands the complexity of the past and reveals her empathy for a more hopeful time when love and peace were fresh thoughts rather than a debased slogan.
The Brothers Jarman maintain a taut, propulsive sound. There’s no let up at all, and even the more melodic entries maintain a considerable amount of swagger and sway.
Does every album have to be a classic? Minor pleasures are still pleasures, at the end of the day.
The Popguns are an archetypal '80s/'90s Brit indie band who, although they can knock out a passable tune, lack the inspiration or adventure to stray any distance from their fixed musical roots.
Even though Courtney Barnett has tightened and punched up her sound, her songwriting still gets stuck in your head because she gets lost in her own imagination.
UK Next Big Indie Thing loves Pavement, whispering, on US reissue of 2014 debut.
Modern jazz's legendary drummer Jack DeJohnette assembles a post-bop dream team from hell.
Americana cult favorite Shakey Graves whets the appetite of his fans with the pleasantly surprising release of the Nobody's Fool EP.
Another confident expression of this couple's quiet command of music and lyrics, Fortune wins us over again.
Capsule Reviews
Events
Mixed Media
News
Features
By Katherine Factor
From Romanticism to structuralism, the musical ingenuity of Phish pays tribute to a variety of cultural movements; they're more dada than dad rock. [26.Mar.15]
By Amulya Tadimety
Even teenagers two decades removed from The Bends' original release can still find deep emotional connections to its depiction of isolation and dissatisfaction. [25.Mar.15]
Columns
Stars in Our Eyes
For once, a pop artist has rejected the idea of stardom, and as a result, has become one of the world’s most discussed pop stars. [25.Mar.15]
The Amazing Pudding
After the back-to-back-to-back brilliance of their previous three albums, a letdown seemed inevitable; amazingly, Ian Anderson & Co. raised the bar, instead. [19.Mar.15]
From The Blogs
What's for tea, darling? Darling, I said, What's for tea? It's a 1967 pop-art masterpiece. You're going to choke on it, too. A pioneer in the art of the concept album is this week's Counterbalance. [27.Mar.15]
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