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Music
A Tragedy Wanting to Happen: Death and Lana Del Rey
By Jonathan Crossley
Lana Del Rey is both sculpted by pain and feels creatively defined by it. Her recent feud with the Guardian, however, reveals that she is not entirely lost. [23.Jul.14]
The Music That Sprouts Between Empires: Ukrainian Culture Amidst Conflict
Ukraine was once considered the musical heartland of the Russian Empire, its culture thriving between the cracks of various powerful and competing empires. [23.Jul.14]
PS I Love You: For Those Who Stay
Some might be enamoured by the nods to classic rock, and some might not, but what you get in the end is an album of little significance. [23.Jul.14]
David Gray: Mutineers
Deliverance. This being the singer's 10th album, David Gray presents himself as a complete man with these 11 songs. [23.Jul.14]
Uri Caine: Callithump
Solo piano from the idiosyncratic and omnivorous jazz pianist. [23.Jul.14]
Reviews
WedTueMonFriThu
Some might be enamoured by the nods to classic rock, and some might not, but what you get in the end is an album of little significance.
Deliverance. This being the singer's 10th album, David Gray presents himself as a complete man with these 11 songs.
Solo piano from the idiosyncratic and omnivorous jazz pianist.
Reissue of the overlooked indie classic by pop oddballs Eric Matthews and Richard Davies.
The songs on A Period of Review were essential to Leimer developing his own style. Whether or not they're essential to your music library is another matter.
For the Recently Found Innocent, Tim Presley's first studio-made record as White Fence ups the ante over his previous work.
Yasiin Gaye swings back around for round two of the long-playing soul/hip-hop mashups. Nice.
This is a pretty dull record that doesn’t excite the listener – you’ve heard this all done before on Psychocandy or Darklands or elsewhere.
The Hollies were one of the most successful acts of the '60s, but are almost always relegated as a footnote.
Mac Miller continues on his path following money, fame, drugs and alcohol, while writing some clever, craftily worded lyrics along the way.
Day two of Forecastle concluded with the audience being rocked to muscle weakness.
The collaborators are different, but the voice is just as strong, and has only gotten better with time.
America’s hardest working funnyman returns with his 10th full-length album, First of Dismay. Repulsive, repellent, live out your fears.
Carly-Jo is a magnificent addition to New Country sounds, and represents the very best of what country-pop, country-rock or whatever you want to call it has to offer.
(Clan of) Xymox launched their career with the long out-of-print EP Subsequent Pleasures. Dark Entries reintroduces this odd yet compelling recording to those who missed out on it the first time.
With the best of intentions, British producer Daniel Boyle reunites Scratch with his vintage '70s dub equipment.
From the minimalist indie rock of Spoon to the extravagant performance by OutKast, day one of Forecastle did not disappoint.
An updated, exquisite, extraordinary, genuine electronic classic.
If you love crisp, jangly, guitar rock, the Clean's Anthology is quite the collection.
Bubba Sparxxx has made plenty of good songs and a couple of great albums. Made on McCosh Mill Road, unfortunately, has very few of the former and is not the latter.
On 48:13, Kasabian largely eschew rock, pop and melody for a sound dominated by electronica and synths. With this they have lost a lot of what made them so good.
Sheffield lads continue their run of exceptional, hook-laden indie pop with their latest release.
Shattered, Reigning Sound's first full-length in five years, is the kind of record that pays tribute to the past, even walks in its shadow, but also provides its own strut.
Neon Icon showcases all the reasons you love (or hate) RiFF RaFF, but it also proves he can put together a cohesive record.
To measure the success of a jam session is a daunting task. The parameters of success are different than with a composed work, and require a different kind of empathy and listening from both players and audience.
Electronic jazz mashup artist Mark de Clive-Lowe collages together a breathtaking masterpiece.
Give a microphone to a musician and he will record the mortality that surrounds him. Give it to a musician with fear of mortality and he or she will describe what life is all about.
Still more world muzak from the globetrotting English duo.
Capsule Reviews
At times reminiscent of the ‘70s singer-songwriter songbook of Laura Nyro, Double Bind is an affecting listen, even at its poppiest and even when there’s a bare rendition of the title track in almost a cappella format. [21.Jul.14]
Events
Mixed Media
News
Features
By Jonathan Crossley
Lana Del Rey is both sculpted by pain and feels creatively defined by it. Her recent feud with the Guardian, however, reveals that she is not entirely lost. [22.Jul.14]
By PopMatters Staff
To mark Merge Records' silver anniversary, PopMatters picked 25 memorable albums that help tell the label's remarkable history. [21.Jul.14]
Columns
The Weapon of the Future
Ukraine was once considered the musical heartland of the Russian Empire, its culture thriving between the cracks of various powerful and competing empires. [22.Jul.14]
Jazz Today
Smoke Sessions Records is doing it old-school: recording the best musicians in New York playing mainstream jazz that cooks. [14.Jul.14]
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