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Music
Jazz May Be Reeling in Terms of Record Sales, But It's Thriving As an Art Form
What if today’s jazz is a little bit Bill Frisell and a little bit Ornette Coleman? [23.Oct.14]
Subverting the Rules: An Interview with Cory Branan
By Jennifer Kelly
Cory Branan's brand of rocking country doesn't fit very well into music industry slots, but the Nashville-based songwriter is carving an idiosyncratic niche for himself regardless. [23.Oct.14]
Allo Darlin': We Come From the Same Place
On their third album, Allo Darlin’ turn down the twee ever-so-slightly to craft a less precious, more grown-up version of that at which they’ve excelled over their previous releases. [23.Oct.14]
Primus: And the Chocolate Factory with the Fungi Ensemble
Primus covers Willy Wonka, playing up your fuzzy memories of the film's dark heart while subverting the original arrangements. [23.Oct.14]
The Voyage Impulse in the Music of Sting
By Scott Borchert
No matter what hat he wears as an artist, the impulse to voyage beyond defines Sting, as do the impulses that compel him to stay. [22.Oct.14]
Reviews
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On their third album, Allo Darlin’ turn down the twee ever-so-slightly to craft a less precious, more grown-up version of that at which they’ve excelled over their previous releases.
Primus covers Willy Wonka, playing up your fuzzy memories of the film's dark heart while subverting the original arrangements.
This disc marks the official arrival of a major talent: clearly steeped in the blues tradition who can shift seamlessly between feedback-frenzied rawness and cool, old school soul and funk.
This collection of the Chicago psych rock band's previously released non-album tracks adds up to more than the usual rarities compilation.
Singer, guitarist, fiddler, banjo player, Sam Amidon's sixth album is a patchwork of delights.
Another collection of evocative songs, deceptive in their carefully woven simplicity.
Jessie Ware supplies more late-night soul on her sophomore effort, an album that finds her subtly expanding her much-lauded R&B sound.
No One Is Lost is undoubtedly a fun album, but it very much gets lost in its own narrative.
The jazz singer tackles a set of boomer pop "standards", kind of like she was the Perry Como of her generation, and sounds plastic doing it.
“The Cavern”, the one 45-minute song that makes up this EP, is truly worthy of the word “epic” and is a welcome addition to the pantheon of metal music.
Julian Casablancas + The Voidz get weird on Tyranny, but weird doesn't automatically mean quality.
Thirteen years on this seemingly-derivative piece of sludge metal differentiates itself from less interesting acts with one thing: pure sonic filth.
Phantom Radio is the quintessential Mark Lanegan album, both a great starting point for those uninitiated to his world and a document that the most devoted members of his cult fanbase will cherish as one of his best.
Thurston Moore's most ambitious solo album and possibly the best Sonic Youth-related release since 2004's Sonic Nurse.
American-Canadian singer-songwriter Suzie Ungerleider ropes in other Canadian musicians to write songs for her to wildly varying results.
On Live at Wembley Arena, ABBA deliver a tightly choreographed and wildly enjoyable performance during the height of their powers.
By HC
Richard Chartier returns with another exploration of post-modernist exploration in detached existence of suburban pink-hued glamour.
Reissue of the final solo album by the hugely overlooked Australian post-punk hero, Rowland S Howard.
Twin titans of the underground come together to craft essentially what you'd expect a collaboration of this nature to sound like, for better or worse.
In overemphasizing the pure pop side of its style, Jukebox the Ghost oversimplifies and dumbs down its songwriting smarts.
The Nightjar and the Garden is a highly literary effort, a testament to a woman's trying faith in a time and place where it is a commodity that is being continuously challenged.
Simpson's grumbling's gotten boring, but Oh-No's beats are as fresh as they've ever been (straight off the farm, we're talking).
This lost live record captures one of rock’s most unassailable giants, right when it was discovering how to really belt out its “fee-fi-fo-fums”.
Frank Solivan and Dirty Kitchen are poised to become a lasting force in bluegrass and also demonstrate the potential for broader success.
Rhino’s seven CD retrospective box set Soundtracks covers off the bulk of Ry Cooder’s ‘80s film work. Interesting and varied, this is a worthy re-issue.
Even though How I Learned to Write Backwards is arguably the band's darkest hour, it's still affirming and affecting, the final piece in a wonderful trilogy of albums.
The constantly morphing new jazz trio moves into deeply atmospheric, electronic territory and dares you to follow.
This EP bears the mark of idle hands merely wanting to keep busy.
The latest from M.C. Taylor and Scott Hirsch's country-leaning band serves as an re-introduction and a rebirth for their signature sound.
When playing corridos, one must be absolutely modern. If you play them as hard as possible, that helps.
Capsule Reviews
This group definitely shows that it is in vogue with the times and makes an arresting brand of glitchy music. [23.Oct.14]
Events
Did I know the No Hay Banda Trio before I stepped into Rich Mix in sadly up-and-coming Shoreditch? Yes. Was I at all aware that Clare Savage and Bellatrix were hiding a monstrous talent in their minute figures? I do now. [23.Oct.14]
Mixed Media
News
By Scott Mervis
Despite rumblings of a farewell album and tour, the demise of Judas Priest was greatly exaggerated back in 2011. [22.Oct.14]
Features
By Jennifer Kelly
Cory Branan's brand of rocking country doesn't fit very well into music industry slots, but the Nashville-based songwriter is carving an idiosyncratic niche for himself regardless. [22.Oct.14]
By Scott Borchert
No matter what hat he wears as an artist, the impulse to voyage beyond defines Sting, as do the impulses that compel him to stay. [21.Oct.14]
Columns
Jazz Today
What if today’s jazz is a little bit Bill Frisell and a little bit Ornette Coleman? [22.Oct.14]
The Amazing Pudding
The Pineapple Thief mastermind delves into the making of Magnolia, the [un]fair criticisms of fans, and the joys of modern Opeth, among many other topics. [20.Oct.14]
From The Blogs
DVD Reviews
Live at the Rainbow '74 doesn't contain all of Queen's biggest commercial hits, but features some of their heaviest rock from their amazing early days. [20.Oct.14]
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