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Music
The Noir Traveler Returns: The Evolving Sound of Alvarius B.
The Invisible Hands have given us a glimpse of Alvarius B.'s (Alan Bishop) view of the world from the center of Cairo. It's not a happy perspective, but there's a hint of hope. [26.Nov.14]
The Velvet Underground: The Velvet Underground - 45th Anniversary Super Deluxe Edition
Few bands ever had a year like the Velvet Underground did in 1969. Even fewer have a set that documents a year like that as beautifully as this one. [26.Nov.14]
Foreigner: The Complete Atlantic Studio Albums 1977-1991
No more head games: there are some true pop gems worth uncovering on Foreigner's first few albums, but a single-disc best-of would just as well satisfy anyone else. [26.Nov.14]
Pink Floyd: The Endless River
On The Endless Rivers, Pink Floyd sounds as strong as it did during some of its best years. On this almost entirely instrumental album, however, the lyrics are sorely missed. [26.Nov.14]
Andy Stott: Faith in Strangers
With an astonishing lead single and an enveloping album besides, the Manchester producer offers the most vivid expression of his ghostly, brooding vision yet. [25.Nov.14]
Reviews
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Few bands ever had a year like the Velvet Underground did in 1969. Even fewer have a set that documents a year like that as beautifully as this one.
On The Endless Rivers, Pink Floyd sounds as strong as it did during some of its best years. On this almost entirely instrumental album, however, the lyrics are sorely missed.
No more head games: there are some true pop gems worth uncovering on Foreigner's first few albums, but a single-disc best-of would just as well satisfy anyone else.
Revealing the true horsepower behind the Swans’ "Oxygen", this four-song collection should be handled by a professional driver on a closed course.
Mark Van Hoen is not one-offing his Locust resurrection. Not by a long shot.
Game Theory's nervy debut album gets to baffle another generation of listeners with this bulky reissue.
With an astonishing lead single and an enveloping album besides, the Manchester producer offers the most vivid expression of his ghostly, brooding vision yet.
This collaboration between legendary producer the Bug (Kevin Martin) and legendary metal band Earth promises, fulfills, and then promises so much more.
In the age of too much information, Parkay Quarts (AKA Parquet Courts) harness the power of the enigma.
Let’s call Restorations what they are: an American rock band. And a damn fine one at that.
Stevie Nicks is back and she's still singing about angels, gypsies, and Lindsey Buckingham.
Working in Iceland pays off for the Oscar-winning piano player from Once, who takes a major sonic step forward on her second album.
The reissue of the debut album from the band that would become the Shins showcases a raw indie rock sound that bridges that gap between '90s alternative and poignant post-millennial indie pop.
Segall's collection of cast-off numbers is a slow burn build to the single stand-out track.
Privacy is an album that makes us question our expectations of heavy music and, at the same time, our relationship to the scene around it, to social expectations, to people.
Future's latest mixtape proves to be the sonic equivalent of a 40-degree day.
The audio version of British producer Bonobo's latest concert video carries far less value than the DVD and fails to provide a worthwhile supplement to the studio albums.
Pinup banda provides forum for drinking stories and sex dreams; its brass lines tangle together like sweaty bodies.
Sun Zoom Spark gives us a chance to re-evaluate the post Trout Mask Replica-era of the Captain Beefheart story.
Angel Olsen expands her 2014 triumph with five bonus tracks that further exemplify her reliable talent for passionate, powerful songwriting.
Angaleena Presley steps away from the Pistol Annies for a solo album that cements her status as country music's great moralist.
It's not a perfect intro nor a set for the hardcore, but this anniversary set shows the Who are still vital after 50 years.
A rare saxophonist who is comfortable playing baritone, tenor and soprano records an album that is, simply, beautiful.
I Love You's... attempts at wedding theatrical, celestial rock with low-down, pulsing post-rock is a miss in many ways.
Bringing along a few old friends, Bryan Ferry returns to form, crafting a sophisti-pop masterpiece.
Sonic Highways is based around a high-concept idea, but the result is an affirmation of the Foo Fighters' core appeal.
Fistful of Hollow doesn't retread the ground laid out on past records, but instead offers a new path through genres Swingin' Utters continue to explore and, yet again, renders the band's sound fresh and dynamic.
These songs from New Zealand skim and dip, within waves of oceanic imagery, full of Pacific calm or pending storm.
In light of Christopher Owens' never-a-dull-moment backstory and back catalog, the last thing you'd expect is that A New Testament would be as monotonous as it is.
Jessie J fails to reach the glory of high-flying single "Bang Bang" on third album Sweet Talker.
Capsule Reviews
The Settled EP is a great end-of-the-year delicacy and all the more reason to love Prawn. [25.Nov.14]
Events
Mixed Media
News
Features
In a rare interview, iamiwhoami's Jonna Lee opens up about the project's development, its future, and the two full-length albums she scrapped along the way to making the stunning blue. [19.Nov.14]
Soused’s trapped, bleating circus elephants are harbingers of the prison-planet drones and transhuman monstrosities yet to come. Prepare for heightened beatings, motherfuckers. [18.Nov.14]
Columns
Opium Traces
The Invisible Hands have given us a glimpse of Alvarius B.'s (Alan Bishop) view of the world from the center of Cairo. It's not a happy perspective, but there's a hint of hope. [25.Nov.14]
In Defense Of…
When a band performs its best album at shows, over and over, it's like they're admitting that they'll never achieve that particular level of greatness again. [23.Nov.14]
From The Blogs
"Happiness in Slavery" is a standout from Nine Inch Nails' early output not for its confrontational nature, but as a showcase for Trent Reznor's acumen as a musician and a producer. [24.Nov.14]
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