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Music
Us in Their Land: An Interview with Mike Watt
Mike Watt has been in so many iconic bands that it's sometimes easy to lose count, but now, with a stripped-down Italian trio called il sogno del marinaio, Watt is doing his most daring work yet ... [18.Sep.14]
The Juan MacLean: In a Dream
DFA greats the Juan MacLean sound out of their element on their new album, a collection of stripped down pop and '70s rock-flavored electro. [18.Sep.14]
Moonface: City Wrecker
For all his worry over moving around, Spencer Krug's latest Moonface release makes it clear that behind the piano Krug sounds at home, rooted, in a place he's been found and a place he belongs. [18.Sep.14]
Nils Lofgren: Face the Music
Possibly the mother of all box sets, Nils Lofgren’s Face the Music contains 169 tracks, 20 video clips, and a 136-page book, covering a big talent’s long career. [18.Sep.14]
Spoon + !!!: 10 September 2014 - New York (Photos)
Spoon's excellent live show at Central Park's Rumsey Playfield (aka Summerstage) came near the heels of their late-Summer They Want My Soul tour. [18.Sep.14]
Reviews
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DFA greats the Juan MacLean sound out of their element on their new album, a collection of stripped down pop and '70s rock-flavored electro.
For all his worry over moving around, Spencer Krug's latest Moonface release makes it clear that behind the piano Krug sounds at home, rooted, in a place he's been found and a place he belongs.
A group of metal guys take a break and form an '80s-style hardcore band. A good time is had by all.
Possibly the mother of all box sets, Nils Lofgren’s Face the Music contains 169 tracks, 20 video clips, and a 136-page book, covering a big talent’s long career.
The third release from a free jazz cooperative piano trio featuring Craig Taborn, Gerald Cleaver and William Parker
On Atlantic, redemption awaits in the cleansing waters of the river, if not in the chorus of the songs or the hallowed memory of Robert Johnson that Ben Glover invokes.
If you happen to be in the market for a new, hyper-hip iteration of slow-burning electronica, then Jillian Banks is your girl.
On his third release as GRMLN, Yoodoo Park expands and explores pop-punk's roots.
Between Colours reaches for the sun and the stars, not to mention the backs of the bleachers.
Sarah Jaffe speaks volumes while singing very little on Don't Disconnect's futuristic indictment against modernity.
Similar to albums by Kilgour's band the Clean, End Times Undone feels longer than it is, in a good way.
New Orleans musicians rarely disappoint. They come from a world where music is practically akin to religion, and they always seem to know how to rise to the occasion.
Die Antwoord have described their work as "exaggerated experience", and that's apt. Anger, lust, passion, violence - all things through the lens of Die Antwoord become amplified to the point of deafening.
Ten years on, Death from Above 1979 kicks just as much ass.
By time a song ends, one has undergone the journey from ignorance to familiarity accompanied by a sense of Déjà vu as if one already knew what one never has known.
Classic Zeus is sturdy and stormproof, and has enough memorable hooky hooks to make your head spin.
Not all the guest artists fit, and sometimes the connection to Satchmo seems tenuous indeed. But when it works, as it mostly does, the album delivers much pleasure and pleasant surprises.
The Flaming Lips' Wayne Coyne and Steven Drozd's new project is a solid attempt at arty prog-rock, but in the end, they just can't shake sounding like the Flaming Lips.
It's hard to fault a lot of young people for are asking the question of "Who is U2?", because after listening to Songs of Innocence, this is a question that not even the band themselves could answer.
Mike Auldridge is joined on this, his final recording, by fellow dobro masters Jerry Douglas and Rob Ickes. A fitting capstone to a legendary career.
To a large degree, the last year in music has been about the triumph of the smooth.
There are different ways to experience and to express joy. It can be celebratory, or quiet and introspective. Joy in Spite of Everything balances those poles of sound and style on what is one of the most successful jazz releases of the year.
Saying that The Water(s) shows potential would be unfair. Mick Jenkins has already arrived.
Some of these experiments are more successful than others, but it is that basic uptempo, wah-wah inflected, bass-heavy, organ-choogling funk that makes the strongest impression here.
Five years in the making, Martha Davis & the Motels made a triumphant return to New York City.
Pere Ubu's 18th album offers their most cohesive and disturbing vision of dystopian America. A carnival of oblique reference points, it's also their best album of the 21st century.
Mandolin virtuoso Chris Thile and double bass virtuoso Edgar Meyer meet up for a second time, making music that, unsurprisingly, sounds like it was made for virtuosos.
A concise, pure and punchy pop history lesson.
Adrian Thaws is one of Tricky's most successful attempts to achieve reconciliation between the strengths of his established sound, and his need to progress as an artist.
It's a fine line between "retro" and "novelty", but no one walks it better than Brian Setzer.
American Hi-Fi is not a group to reshape the way we hear music. They’re simply a good time.
Three of Shostakovich's symphonies sound as scary as they probably did during their premiere, thanks to a unique orchestra and a unique conductor.
From the top on down, the intent of Forever For Now is perfectly clear: fun. This is one big good time broken into 12 melodically succinct, percussively infectious packages.
Capsule Reviews
Events
New Orleans musicians rarely disappoint. They come from a world where music is practically akin to religion, and they always seem to know how to rise to the occasion. [17.Sep.14]
Mixed Media
News
By Mikael Wood
On Feb. 10, 2013, Kimbra walked onto the Staples Center stage and accepted a Grammy Award from Prince, who added his own… [26.Aug.14]
Features
Mike Watt has been in so many iconic bands that it's sometimes easy to lose count, but now, with a stripped-down Italian trio called il sogno del marinaio, Watt is doing his most daring work yet ... [17.Sep.14]
By William Rosenbeck
Following its name change, Parsonsfield, New England's most exciting folk band, is letting its music speak for itself. [16.Sep.14]
Columns
Sound Souvenirs
Have listeners of the Danish ambient electronic outfit, Croatian Amor, given more of themselves than the musician ever would? [16.Sep.14]
Out of Pocket
The 'Marshall McLuhan' message borne by the MP3 revolution is clear: music is endlessly plentiful and entirely disposable. So what's the message of streaming? [14.Sep.14]
From The Blogs
Spoon's excellent live show at Central Park's Rumsey Playfield (aka Summerstage) came near the heels of their late-Summer They Want My Soul tour. [18.Sep.14]
DVD Reviews
If you've never been a Devo fan, this DVD will give you all the reason you need to remedy the situation. [09.Sep.14]
The Past Is a Grotesque Animal takes a compelling, 20-year long story, and zips far too quickly through it. [04.Sep.14]
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