CFP: The Legacy of Radiohead's 'The Bends' 20 Years On [Deadlines: 29 Jan / 12 Feb]

Music
A Song Can Be About Anything: An Interview with Dan Wilson
By Scott Interrante
In 2014, former Semisonic frontman and "Someone Like You" scribe Dan Wilson released a solo album, re-released his pre-Semisonic band Trip Shakespeare's albums, and challenged his fans about the fact that a song, in fact, can be about anything. [28.Jan.15]
The Lone Bellow: Then Came the Morning
The Lone Bellow knows how to nail a crescendo. The problem with In Came the Morning is that it makes it seem like the band is only good at that. [28.Jan.15]
Björk: Biophilia Live
As Björk’s live shows become increasingly sprawling in their design and execution, less attention seems to be paid on the arrangements and the dynamics of her songs – or rather, their potential to be reworked into something entirely new onstage. [28.Jan.15]
The 2015 Progressive Rock Preview
Forthcoming releases from Steven Wilson, Neal Morse, and many others highlight what is bound to be an excellent year for progressive rock. [27.Jan.15]
Country Fried Rock: Jim White vs. Packway Handle Band
By Sloane Spencer
Beginning today, PopMatters will be running the weekly interview series, Country Fried Rock, which features in-depth interviews with Americana artists. This time up is the Southern Gothic master Jim White and his foray into bluegrass. [27.Jan.15]
Reviews
WedTueMonFriThu
The Lone Bellow knows how to nail a crescendo. The problem with In Came the Morning is that it makes it seem like the band is only good at that.
As Björk’s live shows become increasingly sprawling in their design and execution, less attention seems to be paid on the arrangements and the dynamics of her songs – or rather, their potential to be reworked into something entirely new onstage.
Live at the Lexington 13.11.13 documents a return and pulverizes a myth. This album proves that the band is terribly alive. But it shows at the same time how mortal they are.
If 2013's Carrier was a meditation on loss, Indvid is a bold cry of life, with the duo returning to take inventory of themselves full of energy, poetry, and release.
On Fantastic Planet Noveller's Sara Lipstate spends the early parts of the record selling us on her potential, making us rethink how we hear and feel texture in music, how we understand musical structures.
A re-release of a Moby bonus disc shifts focus back to the one of the artist's neglected talents.
If you own a good chunk of Ball’s catalog, there is nothing essential here. If you don’t, it’s a fine introduction.
Jean Grae is deep in the no-fucks-to-give phase of her career, and it's kind of great.
Björk's devastating ninth album Vulnicura, brutally chronicles the dissolution of her relationship with longtime partner, avant-garde NY filmmaker and sculptor Matthew Barney.
By escaping from her grandiose visions to dwell in her own head, Björk has made a stark and overwhelming record that proves she still has an abundance of ideas to explore, even at a detriment to herself.
Jan St.Werner's huge, vibrant Miscontinuum Album is spellbinding -- and could use fewer guests.
Intimations of mortality echo throughout this fifth solo release from the contemplative Los Angeles singer-songwriter, formerly of Uma and Show of Hands.
This uptown ain't so special; honestly, you're better off staying downtown.
The resurgent mod scene of the late 1970s gets its due.
Fall Out Boy version II makes a bid for the continued evolution of their sound. A mostly entertaining work emerges from this creative maelstrom.
Marilyn Manson's new album experiments with dark blues and alt-country, but it fails to become truly memorable considering the risks each song avoids.
Before becoming the go-to pop music Midas for the likes of M.I.A., Usher, and Madonna, Diplo tried damn hard to be DJ Shadow, and surprisingly, wasn't half-bad at it.
The answer to the album title’s rhetorical question is self-evident--Nile is the river with all the rich suggestiveness that reference implies.
A relaxed but interesting tribute to tenor sax giants Coleman Hawkins and Lester Young from one of today's most eloquent players.
Debut and follow-up albums from Echobelly re-released in expanded editions with b-sides, radio sessions and live material.
Capsule Reviews
Even with all the history built into these songs, Fussell emerges as a vital new singer, musician and torch bearer for every true sound he's come across to now. [27.Jan.15]
Events
Headlining the first of six sold-out shows at New York's Jazz Standard, Lisa Fischer stirred the soul in a spellbinding 60-minute set. [27.Jan.15]
Mixed Media
News
By Ryan Faughnder
Richard Gottehrer is best known as a music man. He helped pen the hits “I Want Candy” and “My Boyfriend’s Back,” produced… [14.Jan.15]
Features
By Scott Interrante
In 2014, former Semisonic frontman and "Someone Like You" scribe Dan Wilson released a solo album, re-released his pre-Semisonic band Trip Shakespeare's albums, and challenged his fans about the fact that a song, in fact, can be about anything. [27.Jan.15]
Forthcoming releases from Steven Wilson, Neal Morse, and many others highlight what is bound to be an excellent year for progressive rock. [26.Jan.15]
Columns
The Amazing Pudding
Fifteen years after its release, Dream Theater's fifth LP remains not only the quintet's truest masterpiece, but arguably the greatest progressive metal album ever made. [22.Jan.15]
Jazz Today
Grammy nominations in jazz are rarely adventurous and usually confusing. Yet this year's slate is intriguing. [18.Jan.15]
From The Blogs
By Sloane Spencer
Beginning today, PopMatters will be running the weekly interview series, Country Fried Rock, which features in-depth interviews with Americana artists. This time up is the Southern Gothic master Jim White and his foray into bluegrass. [27.Jan.15]
Now on PopMatters
Announcements
PM Picks

© 1999-2015 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters.com™ and PopMatters™ are trademarks
of PopMatters Media, Inc.

PopMatters is wholly independently owned and operated.