CFP: The Legacy of Radiohead's 'The Bends' 20 Years On [Deadlines: 29 Jan / 12 Feb]

Music
Listening Ahead: Upcoming Music Releases for February 2015
By Matthew Fiander and Arnold Pan
Get a sneak peek of some of February's most intriguing releases, including albums by Father John Misty, José Gonzaléz, and Dan Deacon. [30.Jan.15]
Counterbalance: Eric Dolphys Out to Lunch!
The most accessible avant-garde album ever, or the most avant-garde mainstream jazz album ever? From 1964, something sweet, something tender is this week’s Counterbalance -- straight up and down. [30.Jan.15]
Jessica Pratt: On Your Own Love Again
Grief, upheaval, and a creative exile serve as the backdrop for the latest from rising California singer-songwriter. [30.Jan.15]
Jim White vs. the Packway Handle Band: Take It Like a Man
Following the conceit of the “versus” listed in the artists’ category (“Jim White vs. Packway Handle Band”) title, on Take It Like a Man, White and the band alternately offer songs with just one co-written between them. [30.Jan.15]
Back to What We Really Were All Along: An Interview with the Dodos
By Dan Derks
Individ, the latest by this San Francisco duo, finds them coming back to the same place they started: two "total nerds just being excited" as a duo. [29.Jan.15]
Reviews
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Grief, upheaval, and a creative exile serve as the backdrop for the latest from rising California singer-songwriter
Following the conceit of the “versus” listed in the artists’ category (“Jim White vs. Packway Handle Band”) title, on Take It Like a Man, White and the band alternately offer songs with just one co-written between them.
Not only are these songs about crushes, they feel just like one: emotionally intense, completely beautiful, and above all, fleeting.
Black Star Elephant proves to be a pleasant, uplifting album, though by no means earth shattering.
More than 50 years into her career, Bettye LaVette still has a voice for the ages.
Like that lady who dreams of an Oklahoma where Shirley Jones and Gordon McCrea dwell, we can fantasize of an England where our neighbors lead rich and eccentric lives and invite us over for a friendly spot of tea.
If you like the sound of a saxophone flying solo, just wait until you hear it in a big-ass church.
The pop veins that Vance Joy mines so beautifully are unrequited and disbelieving love, and the songs’ appeal lie primarily in Joy’s voice, a voice that projects tremendous yearning.
The Lone Bellow knows how to nail a crescendo. The problem with Then Came the Morning is that it makes it seem like the band is only good at that.
As Björk’s live shows become increasingly sprawling in their design and execution, less attention seems to be paid on the arrangements and the dynamics of her songs – or rather, their potential to be reworked into something entirely new onstage.
Live at the Lexington 13.11.13 documents a return and pulverizes a myth. This album proves that the band is terribly alive. But it shows at the same time how mortal they are.
If 2013's Carrier was a meditation on loss, Indvid is a bold cry of life, with the duo returning to take inventory of themselves full of energy, poetry, and release.
On Fantastic Planet Noveller's Sara Lipstate spends the early parts of the record selling us on her potential, making us rethink how we hear and feel texture in music, how we understand musical structures.
A re-release of a Moby bonus disc shifts focus back to the one of the artist's neglected talents.
If you own a good chunk of Ball’s catalog, there is nothing essential here. If you don’t, it’s a fine introduction.
Jean Grae is deep in the no-fucks-to-give phase of her career, and it's kind of great.
Björk's devastating ninth album Vulnicura, brutally chronicles the dissolution of her relationship with longtime partner, avant-garde NY filmmaker and sculptor Matthew Barney.
By escaping from her grandiose visions to dwell in her own head, Björk has made a stark and overwhelming record that proves she still has an abundance of ideas to explore, even at a detriment to herself.
Jan St.Werner's huge, vibrant Miscontinuum Album is spellbinding -- and could use fewer guests.
Intimations of mortality echo throughout this fifth solo release from the contemplative Los Angeles singer-songwriter, formerly of Uma and Show of Hands.
Capsule Reviews
A hodgepodge EP from the "intelligent" electronica producer Andrew Lustman, aka FaltyDL, includes remixes from µ-Ziq and Brrd. [29.Jan.15]
Events
Headlining the first of six sold-out shows at New York's Jazz Standard, Lisa Fischer stirred the soul in a spellbinding 60-minute set. [27.Jan.15]
Mixed Media
News
By Ryan Faughnder
Richard Gottehrer is best known as a music man. He helped pen the hits “I Want Candy” and “My Boyfriend’s Back,” produced… [14.Jan.15]
Features
By Matthew Fiander and Arnold Pan
Get a sneak peek of some of February's most intriguing releases, including albums by Father John Misty, José Gonzaléz, and Dan Deacon. [29.Jan.15]
By Dan Derks
Individ, the latest by this San Francisco duo, finds them coming back to the same place they started: two "total nerds just being excited" as a duo. [28.Jan.15]
Columns
The Amazing Pudding
Fifteen years after its release, Dream Theater's fifth LP remains not only the quintet's truest masterpiece, but arguably the greatest progressive metal album ever made. [22.Jan.15]
Jazz Today
Grammy nominations in jazz are rarely adventurous and usually confusing. Yet this year's slate is intriguing. [18.Jan.15]
From The Blogs
The most accessible avant-garde album ever, or the most avant-garde mainstream jazz album ever? From 1964, something sweet, something tender is this week’s Counterbalance -- straight up and down. [30.Jan.15]
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