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The Artist Is Not Present: The Significance of Sia's Anti-Pop Persona
For once, a pop artist has rejected the idea of stardom, and as a result, has become one of the world’s most discussed pop stars. [26.Mar.15]
Too Smart to Be Naïve, Too Young to Be Jaded: 'The Bends' and Teen Angst
By Amulya Tadimety
Even teenagers two decades removed from The Bends' original release can still find deep emotional connections to its depiction of isolation and dissatisfaction. [26.Mar.15]
15 Must-Know Artists from SXSW 2015
Amidst the many artists that flooded SWSX this year, these 15 new and rising talents stand out amidst the fray. [26.Mar.15]
Blood and Thunder: Turning Ashes to Gold
This week's best metal release finds some musical innovators from Brooklyn up to their philosophical shenanigans once again. [26.Mar.15]
Laura Marling: Short Movie
The eclectic guitar becomes a tool that complements Laura Marling's lyrics on this pivotal album, at times articulating visceral anger and, at others, obliterating psychic barriers and clearing space for something new. [26.Mar.15]
Reviews
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The eclectic guitar becomes a tool that complements Laura Marling's lyrics on this pivotal album, at times articulating visceral anger and, at others, obliterating psychic barriers and clearing space for something new.
With heavier rock influence and toned-down electronic methodology, The Scene Between represents the Go! Team's greatest deviation from their original template yet.
Goon isn’t great, but it is a fine example of what might evolve from pure pop purpose.
Andrew Combs is either ignorant of or recording in deference to the past by rekindling the gilded countrypolitan spirit on his sophomore release, All These Dreams.
The Booster series wraps up as the world bids farewell to Edgar Froese.
There's an innovative sound happening here, with many tracks sounding like they came from the soundtrack of some dystopian sci-fi world or even just the dark Orwellian future that’s currently on Earth’s horizon right here in 2015.
Earl Sweatshirt leaves shock horror behind and finds something much better on his brilliant third album.
In the end, this is exactly what we have come to expect from Lightning Bolt; a set list of fuzzy, overwhelming, noise rock that keeps it simple while never missing its target.
Tulsa speaks to more than the desolate environs its sound sometimes suggests.
Distressing, awkward, disturbing and almost upsetting, this aura of discomfort, if combined with the sound of the term itself (|ˈkɒntrətɒ̃|) is the essence of the music presented by Joel Ebner.
Junior Wells and his men straddle two decades and lay down 15 gems.
Forgoing the obvious hits and contemporary pop star collaborators, iconoclast Van Morrison raises the bar for what duet albums can and should be.
The assortment of different tunes here suggests McKay understands the complexity of the past and reveals her empathy for a more hopeful time when love and peace were fresh thoughts rather than a debased slogan.
The Brothers Jarman maintain a taut, propulsive sound. There’s no let up at all, and even the more melodic entries maintain a considerable amount of swagger and sway.
Does every album have to be a classic? Minor pleasures are still pleasures, at the end of the day.
The Popguns are an archetypal '80s/'90s Brit indie band who, although they can knock out a passable tune, lack the inspiration or adventure to stray any distance from their fixed musical roots.
Even though Courtney Barnett has tightened and punched up her sound, her songwriting still gets stuck in your head because she gets lost in her own imagination.
UK Next Big Indie Thing loves Pavement, whispering, on US reissue of 2014 debut.
Modern jazz's legendary drummer Jack DeJohnette assembles a post-bop dream team from hell.
Americana cult favorite Shakey Graves whets the appetite of his fans with the pleasantly surprising release of the Nobody's Fool EP.
Another confident expression of this couple's quiet command of music and lyrics, Fortune wins us over again.
Skip the self-help books on moving through the grieving process and get this album instead.
Elliott Murphy heads back to his debut album, "a lost classic" re-recorded and re-interpreted for the modern age.
Longley’s greatest strength is her ability to share her emotions while never conceding to whatever adversity comes her way.
Modern French house pioneer and Yeezus co-producer drops his first solo album after years of remixes and singles. Sadly, the result is far too middling.
El Perro Del Mar's self-titled album has its charms, especially in this expanded edition.
Capsule Reviews
Events
Mixed Media
News
Features
By Amulya Tadimety
Even teenagers two decades removed from The Bends' original release can still find deep emotional connections to its depiction of isolation and dissatisfaction. [25.Mar.15]
By Brian Schmitt
The Bends is the 20th century's identity emerging under pressure, forced to search bleakly for some form of cohesion among an increasingly artificial and commercial world. [24.Mar.15]
Columns
Stars in Our Eyes
For once, a pop artist has rejected the idea of stardom, and as a result, has become one of the world’s most discussed pop stars. [25.Mar.15]
The Amazing Pudding
After the back-to-back-to-back brilliance of their previous three albums, a letdown seemed inevitable; amazingly, Ian Anderson & Co. raised the bar, instead. [19.Mar.15]
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