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Hope Despite the Times: 12 Essential Alternative Rock Albums from the 1980s
By PopMatters Staff
For those interested in acquainting themselves with the alternative rock's rich and diverse early years, Sound Affects has assembled this '80s alt-rock primer. [27.Aug.14]
Tongue Firmly in Cheek: An Interview with Ace Frehley
Several years sober, KISS' Ace Frehley comes fresh off some time at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame to release his first solo album in over five years -- and definitely knows how to write a sexy song better than Robin Thicke. [27.Aug.14]
The New Pornographers: Brill Bruisers
Brill Bruisers, with its blaring, neon keyboards and deep hooks, is both a prototypical New Pornographers record and another variation on the band's established themes. [27.Aug.14]
Todd Snider: Cheatham Street Warehouse
Snider covers Kent Finlay on Cheatham Street Warehouse to raise funds for Finlay’s medical care. [27.Aug.14]
Afropunk Fest: 23-24 August 2014 - Brooklyn, NY (Photos)
Afropunk Fest felt more politically charged this year. People had their hands in the air as a tribute to Michael Brown nearly as often as they did for the performers. [27.Aug.14]
Reviews
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Brill Bruisers, with its blaring, neon keyboards and deep hooks, is both a prototypical New Pornographers record and another variation on the band's established themes.
Snider covers Kent Finlay on Cheatham Street Warehouse to raise funds for Finlay’s medical care.
Matt Sharp's side project-turned-band is back, and they sound just like most of you remember them. But is that really such a good thing?
When May rants about a "Wild Woman", we know that it's the woman that lives inside her. She ferociously attacks the lyrics, growling and stuttering as needed.
Soulful duo Kindred the Family Soul retain the refined persona of R&B on latest album A Couple Friends.
The UK progressive house duo is in transition on their latest full-length.
For its themes of loss and longing, its wide-eyed sense of wistfulness, for all of its hopefulness in misfortune, Lose ends up being a win.
Liam Bailey’s first full length album, Definitely Now , is so genre-defying that if not for the unmistakable voice of Bailey, it could seem like a mixtape of several artists.
A sawed-off, hard-bitten punk sensibility and a bluesy, drawn-out compulsion to sink deeper into cloudy depths. The Gun Club's debut from 1981 wallops on this reissue as exciting, entertaining and evil as ever.
Peter Gabriel Live in London... So?
In trying to sound like everything else on the charts, Ariana Grande continues to have one of pop music's most distinctive voices that has very little to say.
With its smorgasbord of texture and tones, Neuroplasticity is a real contender for Canadian Album of the Year.
There's a coffin-like closeness and aloneness to each and every song on Mirel Wagner's Sub Pop debut. It's a fitting feel for a record so focused on death.
It’s safe, which only gets The Breeze: An Appreciation of JJ Cale so far, but, this record will undoubtedly get a lot of people to revisit, or discover JJ Cale, which is a win in itself.
Both of these compilations provide interesting ways into a time and sound all too overlooked in certain circles, at least (hopefully) until now.
With Meshes of Voice, Norwegians Jenny Hval and Susanna Wallumrød come together to craft an avant garde masterpiece.
This is a huge step forward for the band, while preserving all of the most attractive qualities of the debut.
Folk troubadour Richard Thompson commits an intimate solo studio performance of his classics to tape, highlighting both his skills as a guitarist and exceptional songwriter.
At their best, Bishop Allen develop a time and a place through memorable hooks and high craft, but they just can't sustain it for the whole album.
Richie Hawtin returns to the name that made him a godfather of minimal techno.
Soft is the opposite to what the title suggests. Instead this is an album of quick, jagged rock and roll, New York style. Take it or leave it.
There's much to like about Roddy Frame, and much to admire about this album. Shame it lacks a killer tune.
Connections' Into Sixes is the band truly hitting its stride while also testing its limits in exciting ways.
They say that misery loves company, which is why blues music remains so popular.
It all comes down to the songs, and that weathered 'n' warm voice and guitar.
Throwback chameleon Paloma Faith changes skin again, appointing herself the Queen of Retro Soul Disco and infusing every track with her irrepressible melodrama and charm.
Capsule Reviews
Events
Mixed Media
News
By Mikael Wood
On Feb. 10, 2013, Kimbra walked onto the Staples Center stage and accepted a Grammy Award from Prince, who added his own… [26.Aug.14]
Features
Several years sober, KISS' Ace Frehley comes fresh off some time at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame to release his first solo album in over five years -- and definitely knows how to write a sexy song better than Robin Thicke. [26.Aug.14]
The acclaimed L.A. producer Adrian Younge talks about his new album with Souls of Mischief, why he hates ProTools, and about his slew of upcoming projects. [25.Aug.14]
Columns
Kickin' Up Dust
Has country music lost its capacity for brutal, unshakeable loneliness? Or are we just experiencing some calm before the next, inevitable heartache? [24.Aug.14]
Continental Drift
The music of the Caucasus is powered by national ardour and ritual. All that's needed is an open and willing audience to accept the undisclosed gifts it brings. [20.Aug.14]
From The Blogs
Afropunk Fest felt more politically charged this year. People had their hands in the air as a tribute to Michael Brown nearly as often as they did for the performers. [27.Aug.14]
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