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Music
The 18 Stock Ways of Beginning and Ending an Album
By Chris Kopcow
Whether by chance or by careful planning, there is an observable pattern to intros and outros in albums. PopMatters breaks down 18 of them. [28.Jul.14]
Storm in a Teacup: An Interview with Bedouin Soundclash's Jay Malinowski
Canadian artist Jay Malinowski takes to the high seas for his lushly sprawling sophomore effort Martel. [28.Jul.14]
Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers: Hypnotic Eye
Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers provide a blistering reminder of rock 'n' roll's subversive nature with Hypnotic Eye. [28.Jul.14]
Braid: No Coast
Late-'90s emo heroes Braid return with their first record in almost two decades. [28.Jul.14]
Dance This Mess Around: The B-52's - Lava
Nowhere else in their discography have the B-52's made such a blatant song about having sex (which is to say nothing of their use of the word "Herculaneum"). [28.Jul.14]
Reviews
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Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers provide a blistering reminder of rock 'n' roll's subversive nature with Hypnotic Eye.
Late-'90s emo heroes Braid return with their first record in almost two decades.
Ed Sheeran certainly doesn't exceed expectations, but he delivers something that resembles a solid mish mash of genres and often cliche lyrics about romance and breakups.
50 Cent's latest album is more of the same old 50.
On his sixth recording, this young UK pianist based in New York brings his trio into a fully improvised encounter with British avant-garde saxophone legend Evan Parker.
By HC
Fans of Nils Frahm must be introduced to Otto A Totland, whose delicate piano melodies will forever feel like home.
Legend presents Bob Marley at his most unthreatening, and most anodyne. And that was intentional.
Frequent collaborators (trumpet and piano) make their first duet album, interpreting the “shape-note singing” tradition. Simple, different, delightful.
Kitten may be a young band, but it has an old style. That it partially misses the mark is just an example of music being way too regressive for its own good.
Nerina Pallot’s fifth and sixth EPs of 2014 are both challenging and ambitious with big ideas, from pop to disco to funk to electro.
As a title, Encino Man works both as a shout-out to John's beloved L.A. and a wink toward vintage coolness -- the album is a virtual love letter to '70s and '80s pop radio.
With Conversations, drummer Stanton Moore moves away from the groove-infused work of his previous albums and work with Galactic and into straight ahead jazz territory.
Chalice provided the grooviest kicks seen along old Route 66 in some time.
Yankovic's release-week overexposure lead him to having his first #1 album, but the parodies prove to be way better than the originals this go-round. #Accordions
These are faithfully recreated jet-setting sounds from the golden age of air travel, and the highs hit quite high.
Reformed British band Unkle Bob reform and return with characteristic charm on third album Embers.
LA-based tunesmith Devon Williams decides to join his peers and craft a musical exploration of that trendiest of decades, the 1980s.
The man who never met a genre he couldn't master tackle old-school hip-hop, delivering a solid effort that is more hits than misses.
The real variance between a band of sophisticated copycats and this bunch is indeed intelligence.
Forecastle rounded out its 2014 installment with aplomb, proving that it is only going to get bigger and better from here on out.
Some might be enamoured by the nods to classic rock, and some might not, but what you get in the end is an album of little significance.
Deliverance. This being the singer's 10th album, David Gray presents himself as a complete man with these 11 songs.
Solo piano from the idiosyncratic and omnivorous jazz pianist.
Reissue of the overlooked indie classic by pop oddballs Eric Matthews and Richard Davies.
The songs on A Period of Review were essential to Leimer developing his own style. Whether or not they're essential to your music library is another matter.
Festival organizers won the day by pulling in some top talent from the nation’s jazz capital (New Orleans, of course) to mark the occasion.
For the Recently Found Innocent, Tim Presley's first studio-made record as White Fence ups the ante over his previous work.
Yasiin Gaye swings back around for round two of the long-playing soul/hip-hop mashups. Nice.
This is a pretty dull record that doesn’t excite the listener – you’ve heard this all done before on Psychocandy or Darklands or elsewhere.
The Hollies were one of the most successful acts of the '60s, but are almost always relegated as a footnote.
Mac Miller continues on his path following money, fame, drugs and alcohol, while writing some clever, craftily worded lyrics along the way.
Day two of Forecastle concluded with the audience being rocked to muscle weakness.
Capsule Reviews
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Mixed Media
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By Chris Kopcow
Whether by chance or by careful planning, there is an observable pattern to intros and outros in albums. PopMatters breaks down 18 of them. [27.Jul.14]
Canadian artist Jay Malinowski takes to the high seas for his lushly sprawling sophomore effort Martel. [27.Jul.14]
Columns
The Amazing Pudding
A Passion Play tends to draw the most resistance from even prog-rock aficionados; it obliges time and attention to let it work its charms. [23.Jul.14]
The Weapon of the Future
Ukraine was once considered the musical heartland of the Russian Empire, its culture thriving between the cracks of various powerful and competing empires. [22.Jul.14]
From The Blogs
Nowhere else in their discography have the B-52's made such a blatant song about having sex (which is to say nothing of their use of the word "Herculaneum"). [28.Jul.14]
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