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Music
Four of a Kind: A Breakdown of Sloan's 'Commonwealth'
By Aaron Pinto
Sloan's jaw-dropping double album Commonwealth strikes a perfect synergy between the band's identity and the collective identities of its members. [30.Oct.14]
Medicine: Home Everywhere
Home Everywhere is a brave record, one that you have to be patient with. [30.Oct.14]
One Chord to Another: A Retrospective on the Records of Sloan
By Aaron Pinto
We look through the varied and vivacious 20-year discography of Sloan album by album, charting this underrated group's significant achievements. [29.Oct.14]
Power to the People: An Interview with Basement Jaxx
Many Jaxx fans were surprised by the relatively-straightforward nature of the duo's latest effort, Junto, but the way Felix tells it, it's a deliberately unexpected move from the Grammy-nominated duo. [29.Oct.14]
Lily & Madeleine: Fumes
Lily & Madeleine may not shout or scream, or even cry, but they still want to be heard. [29.Oct.14]
Reviews
ThuWedTueMonFri
Daniel Lanois has upped the ante with Flesh and the Machine by pledging to search "for something that’s never been heard before".
Home Everywhere is a brave record, one that you have to be patient with.
Betty Who's debut album is not the standout debut that this charismatic pop star deserves.
An ideal fusion of old school hard blowing jazz and new generation rhythms and attitude, this disc feels like the path forward.
Listening to the entire production on offer here means delving inside an artist's trajectory. Naivety, genius and clever pop.
What was it like to hear the Peter Gunn music for the first time? Some of us will never know for sure. But with this release, you're likely to have fun trying to recapture the moment.
Lily & Madeleine may not shout or scream, or even cry, but they still want to be heard.
The Killer makes an album worthy of his reputation, aided by an all-star cast and co-producer (and fellow music legend) Jim Keltner.
Today's weather forecast predicts rain, pain, moths and tombstones. Best pack an umbrella.
You have to admit that it’s nice to have KMFDM still making music, even if the band’s relevance at this point is in question.
The Pine Hill Haints supply antique sounds, modern attitude, and a good time all around.
Sólstafir won't go gentle into that good night.
The Flaming Lips, with the help of more than a few friends, tackle an icon. Literally.
On their ninth album, Obituary continue to deliver ash-blackened riffage and unintelligible, swamp-creature squeals straight from the bile sac.
So It Is With Us finds Horse Feathers aging wisely, perhaps even enjoying life a little bit more.
Night Safari is a record of memorable moments interspersed with randomness. Or, worse, little of actual substance.
The gloriously varied piano trio returns to a program of all-original music, still mixing jazz, rock, classical, avant-garde, and you-name-it styles in a way that defies convention.
Poe’s raven crowed “Nevermore” not “Nevermind”. If there is no God and no devil, then why there is death is the unanswerable koan here.
The Scottish band reconcile their previous modes by pulling back on the electronic drive of their last album, while continuing to elevate tension gradually rather than release it for maximum devastation.
An album that moves the band onward and upward, further and deeper – a journey begun a long time ago in a 1980s galaxy far, far away.
Jazz's troubled bassist gets another posthumous collection. No new insights gained here, just a reminder of his ambitions.
The 2005 debut by this Philadelphia noise-punk band sounds right at home in the fall of 2014.
The Heliocentrics and Melvin Van Peebles create an ambitious, "cosmic" effort with collaboration The Last Transmission.
Port Juvee is Canada's version of the Strokes. Say what you will.
This mammoth edition of a truly classic album is worth it for fans for the wealth of material and insight into the choices involved in its creation.
Many of the Aislers Set's moods prefer melancholy. They mass classic pop and post-punk behind a yearning woman's small, echoed voice that demands attention.
Cherry Red Records affords these Scottish jangle-poppers and perennial underdogs a second chance some 30 years later with an odds and sods collection of demos, aborted singles and an unreleased album.
Over two decades on, Failure remains a rewarding listen, steeped in its time yet sweetly out of place.
This is a record to be entertained by, nothing more or nothing less.
Tre Mission proves nonconformity pays off on debut Stigmata.
Capsule Reviews
Valse 333 is art, accessibly weird and wonderful art, and a real bonbon for those who savour richness in their music. [30.Oct.14]
Events
Mixed Media
News
Features
By Aaron Pinto
Sloan's jaw-dropping double album Commonwealth strikes a perfect synergy between the band's identity and the collective identities of its members. [29.Oct.14]
By Aaron Pinto
We look through the varied and vivacious 20-year discography of Sloan album by album, charting this underrated group's significant achievements. [28.Oct.14]
Columns
Jazz Today
What if today’s jazz is a little bit Bill Frisell and a little bit Ornette Coleman? [22.Oct.14]
The Amazing Pudding
The Pineapple Thief mastermind delves into the making of Magnolia, the [un]fair criticisms of fans, and the joys of modern Opeth, among many other topics. [20.Oct.14]
From The Blogs
Before you go out to your favorite haunted house or visit your favorite witchy woman, be sure to have the proper monster music handy. [29.Oct.14]
DVD Reviews
Live at the Rainbow '74 doesn't contain all of Queen's biggest commercial hits, but features some of their heaviest rock from their amazing early days. [20.Oct.14]
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