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Music
Listening Ahead: Upcoming Music Releases for November and December 2014
By Matthew Fiander and Arnold Pan
In the last installment of "Listening Ahead" of 2014, read up on new albums by Marianne Faithfull and Andy Stott, as well as comprehensive boxsets of the third Velvet Underground album and the Bedhead catalog. [31.Oct.14]
Counterbalance: Prince's '1999'
We were dreaming when we wrote this, so sue us if it goes astray. The Purple One’s 1982 breakthrough is the 199th most acclaimed album of all time, and it’s the subject of this week’s Counterbalance. All the hippies sing together. [31.Oct.14]
Taylor Swift: 1989
A 40-foot Taylor Swift stomps through Manhattan in chelsea boots and a pencil skirt, bodegas and halal carts crumbling under her heels, waving one enormous pinky finger to Jay and Beyoncé as they cower in their Tribeca penthouse. [31.Oct.14]
Various Artists: The Soul of Designer Records
This is a compilation of ‘70s gospel and soul singles that appropriately honors the musicians who made them while offering a crucial glance at the stylistic elements of the American musical tradition. [31.Oct.14]
Four of a Kind: A Breakdown of Sloan's 'Commonwealth'
By Aaron Pinto
Sloan's jaw-dropping double album Commonwealth strikes a perfect synergy between the band's identity and the collective identities of its members. [30.Oct.14]
Reviews
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A 40-foot Taylor Swift stomps through Manhattan in chelsea boots and a pencil skirt, bodegas and halal carts crumbling under her heels, waving one enormous pinky finger to Jay and Beyoncé as they cower in their Tribeca penthouse.
This is a compilation of ‘70s gospel and soul singles that appropriately honors the musicians who made them while offering a crucial glance at the stylistic elements of the American musical tradition.
This is an album that works best when you sit down and think about it afterward, so the appeal is not necessarily apparent upon casual listening.
No matter what category you pigeonhole him into, jazz clarinetist Louis Sclavis turns his sounds into a miniature miracle.
A tribute to a singer, her songs and her legacy, and a collection of very special music in itself.
EndAnd call themselves a punk band, but the power trio bring a distorted grunge rock sound to the party as well.
Daniel Lanois has upped the ante with Flesh and the Machine by pledging to search "for something that’s never been heard before".
Home Everywhere is a brave record, one that you have to be patient with.
Betty Who's debut album is not the standout debut that this charismatic pop star deserves.
An ideal fusion of old school hard blowing jazz and new generation rhythms and attitude, this disc feels like the path forward.
Listening to the entire production on offer here means delving inside an artist's trajectory. Naivety, genius and clever pop.
What was it like to hear the Peter Gunn music for the first time? Some of us will never know for sure. But with this release, you're likely to have fun trying to recapture the moment.
Lily & Madeleine may not shout or scream, or even cry, but they still want to be heard.
The Killer makes an album worthy of his reputation, aided by an all-star cast and co-producer (and fellow music legend) Jim Keltner.
Today's weather forecast predicts rain, pain, moths and tombstones. Best pack an umbrella.
You have to admit that it’s nice to have KMFDM still making music, even if the band’s relevance at this point is in question.
The Pine Hill Haints supply antique sounds, modern attitude, and a good time all around.
Sólstafir won't go gentle into that good night.
The Flaming Lips, with the help of more than a few friends, tackle an icon. Literally.
On their ninth album, Obituary continue to deliver ash-blackened riffage and unintelligible, swamp-creature squeals straight from the bile sac.
So It Is With Us finds Horse Feathers aging wisely, perhaps even enjoying life a little bit more.
Night Safari is a record of memorable moments interspersed with randomness. Or, worse, little of actual substance.
The gloriously varied piano trio returns to a program of all-original music, still mixing jazz, rock, classical, avant-garde, and you-name-it styles in a way that defies convention.
Poe’s raven crowed “Nevermore” not “Nevermind”. If there is no God and no devil, then why there is death is the unanswerable koan here.
The Scottish band reconcile their previous modes by pulling back on the electronic drive of their last album, while continuing to elevate tension gradually rather than release it for maximum devastation.
An album that moves the band onward and upward, further and deeper – a journey begun a long time ago in a 1980s galaxy far, far away.
Jazz's troubled bassist gets another posthumous collection. No new insights gained here, just a reminder of his ambitions.
The 2005 debut by this Philadelphia noise-punk band sounds right at home in the fall of 2014.
The Heliocentrics and Melvin Van Peebles create an ambitious, "cosmic" effort with collaboration The Last Transmission.
Port Juvee is Canada's version of the Strokes. Say what you will.
Capsule Reviews
Valse 333 is art, accessibly weird and wonderful art, and a real bonbon for those who savour richness in their music. [30.Oct.14]
Events
Mixed Media
News
Features
By Matthew Fiander and Arnold Pan
In the last installment of "Listening Ahead" of 2014, read up on new albums by Marianne Faithfull and Andy Stott, as well as comprehensive boxsets of the third Velvet Underground album and the Bedhead catalog. [30.Oct.14]
By Aaron Pinto
Sloan's jaw-dropping double album Commonwealth strikes a perfect synergy between the band's identity and the collective identities of its members. [29.Oct.14]
Columns
Jazz Today
What if today’s jazz is a little bit Bill Frisell and a little bit Ornette Coleman? [22.Oct.14]
The Amazing Pudding
The Pineapple Thief mastermind delves into the making of Magnolia, the [un]fair criticisms of fans, and the joys of modern Opeth, among many other topics. [20.Oct.14]
From The Blogs
We were dreaming when we wrote this, so sue us if it goes astray. The Purple One’s 1982 breakthrough is the 199th most acclaimed album of all time, and it’s the subject of this week’s Counterbalance. All the hippies sing together. [31.Oct.14]
DVD Reviews
Live at the Rainbow '74 doesn't contain all of Queen's biggest commercial hits, but features some of their heaviest rock from their amazing early days. [20.Oct.14]
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