Call for Music Writers... Rock, Indie, Hip-hop, R&B, Electronic, Americana, Metal, World and More

Music
What's Not to Love About the Trombone?
There was a time when jazz trombonists like Glenn Miller were mega-stars. Not so today, but talents like those of Ryan Keberle and Joe Fiedler make the case that they should be. [31.Mar.15]
Country Fried Rock: John Moreland Interview
John Moreland just cannot write a happy song. That's not a critic's assessment: he says so himself. [31.Mar.15]
Death Cab for Cutie: Kintsugi
This isn't the sound of "indie rock", nor is it "dad rock". This is "obligation rock", a forced brand of music that exists just because it has to. [31.Mar.15]
Vetiver: Complete Strangers
A lack of substance, coupled with an occasionally overwhelming “lite-ness” that veers dangerously close to easy-listening, makes Complete Strangers a less-than-solid effort. [31.Mar.15]
'The Bends' and the Blazing of a Trail Into the New Millennium
By Vance Martin
Amidst a transformational time in the post-Vietnam and post-Reagan eras, The Bends represented a transition between the tumultuous latter half of the 20th century and the new millennium ahead. [30.Mar.15]
Reviews
TueMonFriThuWed
This isn't the sound of "indie rock", nor is it "dad rock". This is "obligation rock", a forced brand of music that exists just because it has to.
A lack of substance, coupled with an occasionally overwhelming “lite-ness” that veers dangerously close to easy-listening, makes Complete Strangers a less-than-solid effort.
Benjamin Clementine's emotional cup runneth over... again and again.
Perfect Abandon seems to try and fit as many people into a tiny corner as possible. It's a straight-ahead folk record, but it walks that straight road with a crooked walk.
Art Pepper reignites his stake on the jazz industry in this modernized re-issuing of the first in his Neon Art series, originally pressed onto vinyl in 2012.
Nearly five years after his last studio effort, Sufjan Stevens brings us a quiet meditation on grief.
The first new studio album since 1967 from these garage rock legends has its faults, but it's an overall solid addition to their already classic discography.
This is pop music that's also anti-pop music. It's consistently accessible and intentionally confusing.
These Tall Trees veers towards a psych-lite sound, mostly upbeat and effervescent.
Recording in mono might seem like a back-to-basics move but the Mavericks never forgot what they were about anyway.
Religious music, black metal, electronic, and 8-bit all come together in this bizarre yet ultimately captivating philosophical tome from Liturgy.
It roars, dilutes, squeals, shrieks, pulsates and squawks. Welcome to the world of Zu.
Chastity Belt brings the '90s nostalgia, but forgets to bring the variety along with it.
Pug fought through some tough times to produce this optimistic, rewarding record.
The candor of Bingham on Bingham reveals an intimate portrait of love and hope on Fear and Saturday Night.
True to its name, Vibes comes chock-full of different vibes for different situations.
The eclectic guitar becomes a tool that complements Laura Marling's lyrics on this pivotal album, at times articulating visceral anger and, at others, obliterating psychic barriers and clearing space for something new.
With heavier rock influence and toned-down electronic methodology, The Scene Between represents the Go! Team's greatest deviation from their original template yet.
Goon isn’t great, but it is a fine example of what might evolve from pure pop purpose.
Andrew Combs is either ignorant of or recording in deference to the past by rekindling the gilded countrypolitan spirit on his sophomore release, All These Dreams.
The Booster series wraps up as the world bids farewell to Edgar Froese.
There's an innovative sound happening here, with many tracks sounding like they came from the soundtrack of some dystopian sci-fi world or even just the dark Orwellian future that’s currently on Earth’s horizon right here in 2015.
Earl Sweatshirt leaves shock horror behind and finds something much better on his brilliant third album.
In the end, this is exactly what we have come to expect from Lightning Bolt; a set list of fuzzy, overwhelming, noise rock that keeps it simple while never missing its target.
Tulsa speaks to more than the desolate environs its sound sometimes suggests.
Distressing, awkward, disturbing and almost upsetting, this aura of discomfort, if combined with the sound of the term itself (|ˈkɒntrətɒ̃|) is the essence of the music presented by Joel Ebner.
Junior Wells and his men straddle two decades and lay down 15 gems.
Capsule Reviews
Events
Mixed Media
News
By Preston Jones
Grantland summed up Leon Bridges’ South by Southwest experience in just eight words: “Watching Leon Bridges Get Famous in Real Time.” There… [31.Mar.15]
Features
By Vance Martin
Amidst a transformational time in the post-Vietnam and post-Reagan eras, The Bends represented a transition between the tumultuous latter half of the 20th century and the new millennium ahead. [29.Mar.15]
By Jennifer Kelly
In Tall Buildings' Erik Hall got the name from recording in a Chicago skyscraper, but notes that "I don't tend to write songs that jump out at the listener, but rather kind of invite the listener in." [29.Mar.15]
Columns
Jazz Today
There was a time when jazz trombonists like Glenn Miller were mega-stars. Not so today, but talents like those of Ryan Keberle and Joe Fiedler make the case that they should be. [30.Mar.15]
Stars in Our Eyes
For once, a pop artist has rejected the idea of stardom, and as a result, has become one of the world’s most discussed pop stars. [25.Mar.15]
From The Blogs
Now on PopMatters
Announcements
PM Picks

© 1999-2015 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters.com™ and PopMatters™ are trademarks
of PopMatters Media, Inc.

PopMatters is wholly independently owned and operated.