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Music
Status Flow: The Kingly Rhymes of Marracash
A household name in his native country, Italy has in Marracash one of its biggest contenders of hip-hop. [24.Apr.15]
Vinyl: The Analogue Record in the Digital Age
By Dominik Bartmanski and Ian Woodward
As a multifaceted cultural object, vinyl has remained a persistent force within our technologically accelerated culture -- although not without bumps in the road. [24.Apr.15]
Scharpling & Wurster: The Best of the Best Show
Numero Group’s 16-disc box set of phone calls featuring Scharpling & Wurster is both the sort of product that might have been lampooned on The Best Show on WFMU as well as a great monument to their first, weird era together. [24.Apr.15]
Counterbalance: XTCs 'Skylarking'
You might not hear of bands talking about XTC as a big influence, but they were certainly in the mix that became the music that was to come. [24.Apr.15]
Squarepusher: Damogen Furies
Even when Damogen Furies starts to become overfamiliar in its spastic rhythmic explorations, Squarepusher finds a way to upset the listener's expectations. [24.Apr.15]
Reviews
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Numero Group’s 16-disc box set of phone calls featuring Scharpling & Wurster is both the sort of product that might have been lampooned on The Best Show on WFMU as well as a great monument to their first, weird era together.
Even when Damogen Furies starts to become overfamiliar in its spastic rhythmic explorations, Squarepusher finds a way to upset the listener's expectations.
A solid album with a number of beguiling songs and a lot of spirit, A Forest of Arms is the sound of a band well into their musical journey, with many more miles still to go.
The music sounds old, as if it was meant to be played on a 78 rpm turntable, but without the scratchiness.
Anthology serves its purpose -- that is, to compile Howe’s solo stock and spotlight him outside the confines of his day job.
John Moreland proves there's nothing sanctimonious about singing the truth on High on Tulsa Heat.
A survivor band if ever there was one, the Charlatans have drawn on personal tragedy to produce one of the stand-out albums of their long career.
Hospital Handshakes is a milestone in Rocky Votolato’s career and one that would do well to serve as a springboard for all his efforts going forward.
There's something about iLoveMakonnen's tone and inflection that turns his wobbly singing and hazy, uncomplicated rapping into reliable ways to deliver hooks. He might not have perfect pitch, but his pop instincts are awfully close.
On Chaos and the Calm,, singer/songwriter James Bay delivers a sound debut album that's never earth-shattering.
Michael McDermott's newest project is off to a promising start. If only it was a little more difficult.
What makes the Alabama Shakes sound new is that they’re evidently devoted to their musical forebears -- everyone from Etta James and Aretha to Bowie and Zeppelin -- yet also coquettishly unfaithful to each one of them.
Eponymous albums aren't for amateurs, and Wire's 13th chunk of full-length steel proves it.
A stunningly ferocious noise album from four masters of their craft.
Blandness sometimes encroaches, but Sexsmith’s 14th record proves, at its strongest, to be a typically warm, reassuring, and likeable piece of work.
Forty four tracks from Lee’s radio show that she never recorded later and have, for the most part, not been heard since they originally aired.
Built to Spill's guitar-driven sound is the indie-rock equivalent of comfort food, indulgent and satisfying in how familiar it is.
No Control turns the trouble of being a very fast fruit into a full-on, true rock and roll experience.
Canadian Coldwave Queen's third heralds the rise of the machines. Quick hide!
This isn’t disconnected from the current country-radio charts entirely; some of what he’s doing is taking familiar tropes and making them sound “fun” and easily digestible.
Eric and Leigh Gibson continue to innovate with a collection of bluegrass covers dedicated to fellow bands of brothers.
For an album that's sparse on ideas and interest it certainly SOUNDS big.
They may party like it's 1995, but 2015 might just be the year of Speedy Ortiz.
English DJ Daktyl's first album of originals suffers from a lack of conviction, but shines in short bursts.
Hold On is full of perky, precocious and thoroughly engaging intent, an album with a more experimental nature that doesn’t diminish ample accessibility. Consider it a must-hear, even if for its sheer ingenuity alone.
Nashville's Sarah Gayle Meech will just as soon kick your ass as she will break your heart on Tennessee Love Song.
A vibrant and lively collection that will please a wide variety of listeners who open their ears to its many layers and surprising connections.
Capsule Reviews
Pale White Dove is one of those albums that demands attention, Doug Burr’s apparent obscurity notwithstanding. [24.Apr.15]
Events
Mixed Media
News
By Randy Lewis
Chris Stapleton (formerly of the SteelDrivers) is readying the release of his debut solo album, Traveller, due May 4, and he’s continuing to swim against the country tide. [22.Apr.15]
Features
By Dominik Bartmanski and Ian Woodward
As a multifaceted cultural object, vinyl has remained a persistent force within our technologically accelerated culture -- although not without bumps in the road. [23.Apr.15]
Doug Martsch and Built to Spill march on. Despite a core lineup shift, they never plan to slow down. [22.Apr.15]
Columns
Continental Drift
A household name in his native country, Italy has in Marracash one of its biggest contenders of hip-hop. [23.Apr.15]
Kickin' Up Dust
There are plenty of good reasons to visit an actual record store besides that one hyped day in April. [21.Apr.15]
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