Call for Essays About Any Aspect of Popular Culture, Present or Past

Music
What He Has Sown: A Discussion with Bruce Soord of The Pineapple Thief
The Pineapple Thief mastermind delves into the making of Magnolia, the [un]fair criticisms of fans, and the joys of modern Opeth, among many other topics. [21.Oct.14]
The Tyranny of Aspiration Culture
By Mark Palermo
Without room for doubt, uncertainty, and even self-hatred, the tyranny of Aspiration Culture prevails, and meaningful defiance is thrown out the window. [21.Oct.14]
Mark Lanegan Band: Phantom Radio
Phantom Radio is the quintessential Mark Lanegan album, both a great starting point for those uninitiated to his world and a document that the most devoted members of his cult fanbase will cherish as one of his best. [21.Oct.14]
Thurston Moore: The Best Day
Thurston Moore's most ambitious solo album and the best Sonic Youth-related release since 2004's Sonic Nurse. [21.Oct.14]
Waiting for the Rails to Rumble: The Cycles of Rock Music
By Benjamin Barrett
The romantic sentiment that rock was better in the past and has, as they say, given up the ghost, is a charming but misguided notion. [20.Oct.14]
Reviews
TueMonFriThuWed
Phantom Radio is the quintessential Mark Lanegan album, both a great starting point for those uninitiated to his world and a document that the most devoted members of his cult fanbase will cherish as one of his best.
Thurston Moore's most ambitious solo album and the best Sonic Youth-related release since 2004's Sonic Nurse.
American-Canadian singer-songwriter Suzie Ungerleider ropes in other Canadian musicians to write songs for her to wildly varying results.
On Live at Wembley Arena, ABBA deliver a tightly choreographed and wildly enjoyable performance during the height of their powers.
By HC
Richard Chartier returns with another exploration of post-modernist exploration in detached existence of suburban pink-hued glamour.
Reissue of the final solo album by the hugely overlooked Australian post-punk hero, Rowland S Howard.
Twin titans of the underground come together to craft essentially what you'd expect a collaboration of this nature to sound like, for better or worse.
In overemphasizing the pure pop side of its style, Jukebox the Ghost oversimplifies and dumbs down its songwriting smarts.
The Nightjar and the Garden is a highly literary effort, a testament to a woman's trying faith in a time and place where it is a commodity that is being continuously challenged.
Simpson's grumbling's gotten boring, but Oh-No's beats are as fresh as they've ever been (straight off the farm, we're talking).
This lost live record captures one of rock’s most unassailable giants, right when it was discovering how to really belt out its “fee-fi-fo-fums”.
Frank Solivan and Dirty Kitchen are poised to become a lasting force in bluegrass and also demonstrate the potential for broader success.
Rhino’s seven CD retrospective box set Soundtracks covers off the bulk of Ry Cooder’s ‘80s film work. Interesting and varied, this is a worthy re-issue.
Even though How I Learned to Write Backwards is arguably the band's darkest hour, it's still affirming and affecting, the final piece in a wonderful trilogy of albums.
The constantly morphing new jazz trio moves into deeply atmospheric, electronic territory and dares you to follow.
This EP bears the mark of idle hands merely wanting to keep busy.
The latest from M.C. Taylor and Scott Hirsch's country-leaning band serves as an re-introduction and a rebirth for their signature sound.
When playing corridos, one must be absolutely modern. If you play them as hard as possible, that helps.
From the club to the bedroom, the Bloc Party frontman explores the empty sensuality of sleeping with complete strangers.
Johnny Marr's second solo album suggests a consummate musician becoming more comfortable with his solo status.
Bestial Burden really knows how to work a mood, and beat that sense of claustrophobic misery right into the ground.
These Birmingham lads mine their musical past to create a sound in keeping with their influences without straying too far from established templates, finding comfort in familiarity.
A long-shelved power pop gem gets its chance to shine.
Trigger Hippy's roots run deep and the down-and-dirty, soul-tinged blues they rock is the real deal.
Try as you might to take Foxygen's ...And Star Power at face value, it's hard to because the mischievous duo does everything but play it straight on the 82-minute double LP.
Coma Witch is a bracing, unapologetic, mesmerizing album. And it could very well be easily one of the best metal albums of the year.
I’ll Be the Tornado is an enrapturing album, and one that you simply must hear with your mind and your heart.
Vashti Bunyan is given the final word on a sporadic yet influential career with the organic swan song Heartleap.
Sarah Silverman's second HBO special/comedy album gives us another healthy helping of rape, incest, oral sex, profanity and jokes about Jews. In other words, Sarah Silverman being herself.
Nation isn't an opus. It's a warning.
The revamped Pixies prove there's plenty of fuel left in the tank yet.
Capsule Reviews
If you’re looking for something new and dare I say a little dubsteppy coming from an American source, Mosaics will certainly satisfy. [20.Oct.14]
Events
Mixed Media
News
By August Brown
On a quiet Tuesday night in September, in an overly air-conditioned Mid-City recording studio, DJ Mustard was alone and preparing to work.… [15.Oct.14]
Features
By Mark Palermo
Without room for doubt, uncertainty, and even self-hatred, the tyranny of Aspiration Culture prevails, and meaningful defiance is thrown out the window. [20.Oct.14]
By Benjamin Barrett
The romantic sentiment that rock was better in the past and has, as they say, given up the ghost, is a charming but misguided notion. [19.Oct.14]
Columns
The Amazing Pudding
The Pineapple Thief mastermind delves into the making of Magnolia, the [un]fair criticisms of fans, and the joys of modern Opeth, among many other topics. [20.Oct.14]
Continental Drift
Spanish punkers came swinging harder than ever, screaming not for the sake of inducing change, but screaming for the sake of screaming – because now they could. [15.Oct.14]
From The Blogs
DVD Reviews
Live at the Rainbow '74 doesn't contain all of Queen's biggest commercial hits, but features some of their heaviest rock from their amazing early days. [20.Oct.14]
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