Third Trailer for 'Inception' Is the Most Informative Yet

by Jonathan Simrin

11 May 2010

Similar to his colleague J.J. Abrams, Director Christopher Nolan has been running the kind of publicity campaign with trailers that offer scarce narrative information. The latest trailer reveals the most plot yet and proves why Inception is one of the most-anticipated blockbusters of the summer season.

Trailer 1

The first teaser trailer, less than a minute long, actually has no dialogue. Nolan cuts together a series of striking images, accompanied by a dramatic, punctuated score: a spinning top, a glass filled with water, a man being dragged away from a helicopter, and Leonardo DiCaprio falling into (out of?) a bath tub. What does it mean? Who knows, but I’m hooked.

Trailer 2

With DiCaprio providing the narration, we now know that he is Inception‘s protagonist and he needs to steal an idea. It looks like Ellen Page will be a Dicaprio’s student and assistant of sorts. This trailer, a few seconds longer than the first teaser, features a few lines of dialogue and we recognize a couple familiar faces from Nolan’s past work (Cillian Murphy and Ken Watanabe).

Trailer 3

About two months before its theatrical release, Warner Bros. unveils a full-length trailer that’s perhaps worthy of a spoiler warning for moviegoers who want to stay in Nolan’s world of ignorant bliss. Dicaprio is a security agent, specializing in psychological security. Day to day, he creates dreams for people, puts them in the dream, and steals their ideas. Strong actors, like Michael Caine, Marion Cotillard, and Joseph Gordon-Levitt round out the supporting cast. Nolan teases us with some breath-taking images that stretch CGI to new levels: avalanches, buildings crumbling into the ocean, and astronauts falling down a mountainside. All in all, we still don’t know much about Inception, but we can’t wait to find out.

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