Dr. Dog + Deer Tick

15 May 2010 - New York

by David Reyneke

17 May 2010

Playing over 20 songs for more than an hour and a half, Dr. Dog's electrifying performance whizzed by.
 

Wrapping up their United States tour, Dr. Dog headlined a sold out Terminal 5 Saturday night. With six albums of material, it was up in the air what the band would choose to perform. What we did know for certain was that this would be the first time catching them playing new tracks from their latest album, Shame, Shame. Kicking off the night with two new songs, “Stranger” and “I Only Wear Blue”, they quickly jumped to some older, more recognizable jams like, “The Old Days”, “Army of Ancients”, “The Rabbit, The Bat & The Reindeer” and “The Breeze”. But don’t get me wrong, it appeared that the audience was more than familiar with the new content, as they all chanted the lyrics in unison. The rest of the night followed suit, as they went back and forth between new and old cuts.
  
They say that times flies when you are having fun. I don’t think that expression could have been any more true than on that night. Playing over 23 songs for more than an hour and a half, Dr. Dog’s electrifying performance seemed to whiz right by. Along with a fantastic musical showing, the lighting effects were spot on. Utilizing an assortment of glow-in-the-dark elements, strobe lights and a disco ball, they took full advantage of what the venue had to offer.

I must also make note of the opening band, Deer Tick. Like Dr. Dog, I have been a fan of this Rhode Island rock band for some time. Dressed in skirts and other female attire, this fivesome was able to rock the crowd with their music, as well as their comedy. Playing some songs off their past records and upcoming album, The Black Dirt Sessions, Deer Tick made quite a lasting impression.

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